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Can Anyone Here ID This Native Orchid?

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Out for a walk tonight and came across this solitary orchid. I've seen plenty of Northern Marsh Orchids around here, but this is the first time I've seen this one. Anyone know what it is?

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Is it a commn spotted? (a lot of these orchids all look the same to me, lol)

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Really need to see a clearer pic of the flower, especially the lobes of the main lip.

It doesn't look like a Common Spotted Orchid, but if this and Northern Marsh both grow close by, it could possibly be a hybrid of the two.

But a better pic of flower is really needed.

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That is cool if it is a hybrid. It is certainly unique looking, I love the spots everywhere. Do hybrids have a good chance at reproducing or do they tend to live and die without spreading?

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Unfortunately, the flower has long gone, so will have to wait until next year to see if it reappears. I suspect though that I won't see it again, as it was growing in an urban area where the volume of people walking through has significantly increased since.

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The picture was taken near the time of the topic post, so end of June.

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Dactylorhiza all flower about the same time here in the UK, so flowering time tells nothing. This year most plants have flowered late.

D. maculata is a possibility, but the pics don't show a fully open flower, nor a clear enough view to be CERTAIN what this is.

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Dactylorhiza all flower about the same time here in the UK, so flowering time tells nothing. This year most plants have flowered late.

D. maculata is a possibility, but the pics don't show a fully open flower, nor a clear enough view to be CERTAIN what this is.

The flowering time is an important help to differentiant species, for example the simplest method to determinate species in the field, Orchis ustulata ssp. ustulata and ssp. aestivalis, also within the Gymnadenia aggregate und last but not least with the genus Dactylorhiza. Here in Central Europe the Dactylorhiza species show good seperate flowering time: So compared with well-separable species in the same habitat, and the sea level, it is a great help in determining.

I know, that same species looks very different in Central Europe and GB, and the prefer different kinds of habitats. So here for example you could never find Dact. fuchsii in open meadows, also it has a different habitus.

My first thought was, that is rather a Dact. majalis , because the lip on the open flowers is round, thethickstemsand the leavesvery broad. Typical Dact. maculata doesn`t show such a lip. But in our area you could never find a buded Dact. majalis end of June, also impossible on 1500m nn.

You are correct, a good determination is only possible to stay in habitat, to see well flowering plants, comparison is possible with other plants (species ) , for exclude the possibility of hybrids etc. It was simple an evaluation, after an experiance of more then 20 years working with the genus Dactylorhiza http://www.cypripedium.at/product48.html

Edited by Gerhard Raschun

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Dactylorhiza fuschii, I am growing some of these as part of my dissertation :) fascinating :)

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The lip is wrong for Dactylorhiza fuchsii

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But the colour of it isn't pale enough to be maculata...and its definitely not a purpurella....

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The lip is also not right to be Dactylorhiza maculata.

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Dactylorhiza are notorious for interbreeding which probably explains why no-one has given a firm ID to this plant.

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If it survives until next flowering then I will get a better picture. Sadly, with the new development in that area, it probably won't. Bit of a shame that it is illegal to save these plants, even when you know they will be killed otherwise.

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Under the Wildlife and Countryside Act, 1981, which covers Britain, it is illegal to uproot any wild plant without permission from the landowner or occupier.

Have a word with the developer/ landowner.

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