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Byblis gigantea - seasonal regime?

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I was lucky enough at Mike's open day this weekend to pick up a couple of strong Byblis gigantea seedlings from Greg Allen. I am sure I am not the first to realise I should have asked more questions at the time. It's clear it likes a well drained medium (peat/sand & perlite - Greg also said he used a little loam) and damp but not wet while growing, and pretty much dry overwinter, rather like Drosophyllum, I guess. However, what I'm not so clear about is temperature and humidity and seasonality. I have a highland nepenthes greenhouse - 80%+ humidity maintained by foggers, 13 to 25 degree extremes. I believe Byblis like a decent temperature and the B.gigantea might do well in there, but on the other hand I have also heard they are prone to rot and don't like excessive humidity. I also have a sarracenia greenhouse, 5 degrees over winter and open door at this time of year. That might suit better, but maybe be too cold? I suppose a third option is windowsill, for overwintering at least? So, I would appreciate any advice as to what kind of temperature and humidity conditions suit this species, both while actively growing and also when dormant. Many Thanks, Dave

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Hi Dave,

I keep most of my B gigantea in a greenhouse heated to about 5 deg c over winter. I invested in winter lighting last winter only, and had a 100% survival rate. In previous winters, most, but not all, seedlings survived kn the greenhouse. I think that lack of light is the main danger in the UK in winter. I have always kept a few reserve plants on a sunny windowsill over winter as well in case of a power failure in the greenhouse during a hard frost. I have never lost a plant on the windowsill over winter, although plants that survive in the greenhouse over winter tend to be a little stronger in spring for some reason.

As for watering, don't keep them bone-dry in winter. I ensure that the bottom of the substrate is always damp, although the surface appears bone dry all year round due to the open nature of the substrate.

Good luck with your plants!

Greg

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Cheers Greg, I'm going to leave them in with the highland nepenthes, the consensus seems to be they would appreciate the extra warmth, and I have lights in there too over winter. What actual soil mix do you use? Thanks, Dave

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