Winter jewels


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AUSTRALIA

Drosera lowriei 'giant'

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Drosera tubaestylis 'Brookton form'

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Drosera whittakeri subsp. whittakeri

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Drosera erythrorhiza subsp. magna

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Drosera erythrorhiza subsp. squamosa 'laterite growing form'

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Drosera browniana

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Drosera rosulata

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Drosera macrophylla subsp. macrophylla

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Drosera macrophylla subsp. monantha

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Drosera zigzagia

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Drosera menziesii subsp. basifolia

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Drosera porrecta 'southern form'

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SOUTH AFRICA

Drosera hilaris

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Drosera coccipetala

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Drosera pauciflora

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Drosera ramentacea

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Drosera cistiflora 'pink fl.'

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Drosera cistiflora 'Darling'

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Oxalis palmifrons

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Albuca spiralis

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Maurizio

Edited by maurizio
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Magnificent plants!

How do you grow D. hilaris? Mine never make the stem. I have small plants around 3 cm (and already several years old), which grow for several months then die to roots and regrow again... They are surviving, but there is no progress to grow bigger.

Adam

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About D. hilaris: I grow it in deep pots, just peat and sand.

During the summer the soil is just slightly damp, almost dry, in a shady position. Plants forms a bud at the tip of the stem,look here

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In Autumn the plant start to grow again and put water in the tray. However it happens to loose plants during the summer.

In winter it is grown outside, min temps -2 °C.

For tuberous drosera I grow all them in the same conditions: peat and sand (not perlite for winter growing plants), dry during the dormancy, water in the tray during vegetative period. Outside, min temps about -2°C.

Maurizio

Edited by maurizio
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Guest Andreas Eils

Oooohhh, Maurizio,

you always manage to impress me! No matter what Drosera: You grow them perfectly! (I also know your amazing Petiolariscomplex plants!)

D. browniana is still my favourite!

By the way, if you should ever have flowers of D. coccipetala, please show them here on the board! :tu:

You wrote "no perlite for winter growing plants". Can you explain me why? I have a little perlite in my soil mixes for tuberous Droserae and I cannot notice any harm. :-/ At least not yet! ;o)

Grazie e cordiali saluti

Andreas

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Thanks for info... maybe i keep my plants too wet as they do not enter the proper dormancy. But i thought, that it should be like in tuberous sundews - first signs of yellowish leaves = lower the moisture and prepare for dormancy.

I am also curious, why you do not use perlite for winter growing species, do you think they would dry out too much? I must admit, that i do not use it either, but i am still curious.

Regards

Adam

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By the way, if you should ever have flowers of D. coccipetala, please show them here on the board! :tu:

Here is a couple of pics of Spring 2012

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Unfortunatly the flower is open just for few hours.

For those who asked my why I don't use perlite for winter growing plants... I think the perlite can absorb moisture and therefore can dehydrate tubers during the dry summer dormancy.

Mau

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Guest Andreas Eils

Buenasera,

Unfortunatly the flower is open just for few hours.

an extremely volatile beauty so to say. Mother nature seems to be very economical with the most beautiful she has to offer! :wink:

What a pity! Such an outstanding flower..... :woot:

For those who asked my why I don't use perlite for winter growing plants... I think the perlite can absorb moisture and therefore can dehydrate tubers during the dry summer dormancy.

Mau

Ah! Thank you for that hint! I dig the tubers out and store them in dry quartz sand and inside small photo tins for dormancy. But for the winter growing African species I shall keep in mind that perlite may help dehydrating the resting bulbs (thickened roots or whatever). :)

Ciao

Andreas

Edited by Andreas Eils
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...But for the winter growing African species I shall keep in mind that perlite may help dehydrating the resting bulbs (thickened roots or whatever). :)

Ciao Andreas... however that's just my opinion :O)

For Daniel:

about D. coccipetala, yes, I pollinated it obtaining many seeds. I have sown them last September but unfortunately no germination.

Mau

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Hi Maurizio,

your plants really are looking good. Interestingly, your D. lowriei giant plants look much different from mine but that may be because I use a top layer of white silica sand which causes some species to develop there rosette before reaching the surface. Doing so, they grow with their leaves adpressed to the substrate. What's the size of your plants?

I also like the D. coccipetala.

Cheers

Dieter

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What's the size of your plants?

Dieter

Hello Dieter, they are 4-5 cm in diameter.

...some species to develop there rosette before reaching the surface

Mine never do that, they begin to develop the rosette as they reach the surface.

Mau

Edited by maurizio
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