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Christian

carnivorous plants in the Cedar Mountains

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Hello,

after we stayed for one night in Clanwilliam we wanted to go further north to Niewoudtville. On this way wanted to visit a location in the Cedar Mountains, where we have been in 2009 to see how the Roridula dentata are doing there.

For me, the Cedar Mountains are amongst the most spectacular landscapes i have ever seen. The rock formations are just incredible. Saddly we had not the best weather at this day.

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It should not take long until we found the first carnivorous plants. This time it was a deep red form of Drosera cistiflora. The flower colors varies from white to light pink in that population.

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The next Drosera we found is Drosera afra, a closely related species to Drosera trinervia.

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This area is also know for a strange form of Drosera cistiflora, that has been discovered by Günter Eitz some time ago, hence the informal name Drosera cistiflora "Eitz"

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Finaly we reached the place where we found the small population of Roridula dentata in 2009. This place is maybe only 10m^2 and there are only very few plants. So we were really happy to see them still growing there!

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There have only been very few of the assasin bugs on the plants. I did not take pictures of any... What caught my attention were the spiders, that are living on these plants as well. You can easily spot their nests even from the distance.

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We spent quite a lot of time there until we had to go as we had to reach Niewoudtville that day. On the way to this small town we had the chance to get a good view of the Gifberg, which was our goal for the next day (and will be my next report).

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You can see some more pictures (also from 2009) on the following links:

landscapes

carnivorous plants

Christian

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Always thought that the only arthropods that could live on the plants of the family Roridulaceae were the insects of the genus Pameridae, so i'm surprised to see spiders occupying the same ecological niche of another predator. Nature doesn't really tired to surprise us.

Thanks for posting the pictures and until next time.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

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Once again, very nice report Christian! A few days ago, I read a paper talking about this spider and was wondering what it looks like, thanks for that pictures.

 

Edited by kisscool_38

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Guest Andreas Eils

Evening Christian,

nature is a great sculptor!

Roridula dentata is for me the most spectacular carnivorous plant in South Africa. Can I call Roridula "carnivorous" now? The latest news I heard were Roridula could also benefit from prey without the help from symbiotic bugs. :unsure: Never known that there are spiders which seriously build nests! :blink: Nothing is impossible as we see again. lol It´s a pretty species. I think I would prefer this spider as a resident on my Roridula instead of the Pameridea bugs... :wink:

Thanks for the photo show, Christian! Always a pleasant sight!

Andreas

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Amazing place, fantastic plants, you bring back great memories of S.A.!! :)

The landscape actually reminds me a lot of several places I explored back home in Brazil. Anyway, this strange D.cist. "Eitz" is a true beauty, I wonder if it is in fact a hybrid between the abundant D.afra and the locally rarer D.cistiflora...

Thanks for the pics!

Fernando

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