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Christian

Drosera trinervia on Lion's Head - South Africa

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Hi,

directly after arriving in Cape Town we wanted to do a short afternoon walk and decided to go to the Signal Hill with the close by Lion's Head.

Hallo,

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There were no clouds at all, so we could enjoy spectacular views down to Cape Town and the Table Mountains. The temperature were around 30°C, a really nice day!

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You will have to pass some ladders to reach the top.

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Besides many interesting plants, you can also find some nice animals there.

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At the point that we needed to go back (it was already late afternoon) we found the first carnivorous plants of our tour! It was Drosera trinervia, most likely the most widespread species of the Western Cape:

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The way back was a bit adventurous. We had no problem to return from the Lion's Head, but we could not find a good way to walk down from Signal Hill to Sea Point, so we decided to go straight down (which is for sure not the best option for some parts of the Signal Hill). We finally arrived in Sea Point only to find out, that we had no idea where exactly we were, so we asked somebody to call a Taxi for us to get back to our hotel. We arrived there at 19pm. Luckily the lady at the hotel was kind enough to take our rental car, which was arranged for 18pm that day. We were totally tired that evening (a 15hrs flight + 5hrs walk), so we went to eat something and went sleeping soon after.

regards,

Christian

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Breathtaking location and lovely photography! Thanks for sharing this with us.

To me, it seems quite hard to find CPs in all those tropical(ish) areas, since they grow where one would least expect them to grow. Where I live, in the temperate regions, it is quite easy - wherever there is a peat bog, it is a 90 % chance that there are CPs there. So basically, to find CPs, just follow the sphagnum... While in Africa those sundews are really tiny and just grow on the most random places. Must be a hell of a search!

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Guest Andreas Eils

Hi Christian,

this year South Africa again? :D You seem to have better weather than 2009. Spectacular landscape indeed!

It seems the bugs in SA practice group sex! ;o) The lizards are really beautiful.

Looking forward to see the other pics! (Gerne auch ein paar Proteen und so. :wink: )

Cheers!

Andreas

Edited by Andreas Eils

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Hi Andreas,

i will for sure post more pictures soon and promise to show the one or the other protea too (i have no idea about most of the non carnivorous plants, so please feel free to name them if you can) ;) The weather this year was very variable. In 2009 it has been a bit more stable on the good side. This year we had all extremes. We started with more/less 30°C in Cape Town. A few days later we had what must be the worst weather south africa can produce, lots of rain, wind and cold. But also, we had the great luck to see some location in sunshine, that we saw 2009 in rain only.

Christian

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Beautiful photos :woot: , Christian. The sundews of South Africa are really fantastic, with their vivid colors.

Thank you so much for sharing with us these wonders of nature.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

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