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scorpio87

CP Lombardy, Italy 2012

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D. rotundifolia

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D. rotundifolia with P. leptoceras

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A realy strong flowering

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U. australis

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This year was a realy dry summer, and this is the only one (bad) flower of U. australis that I found

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Diego.

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That must have been a really nice trip. All those ping flowers... I was in Italy too, near Belluno, but too late for the flowers.

I wonder, how often i missed P. leptoceras considering it only P. vulgaris. So far i have never seen on any of my trips to the Alps the real leptoceras. Or maybe i have seen it, but have not identify it correctly. Is there any easy, clear characteristic to distinguish these two?

The U. australis, does the flower belong to the plant above? I think i see a shoot only with bladders, like the shoots which produce affixed aquatic utrics (U. minor, ochroleuca, stygia etc.). I am thinking about U. minor in this case. Does anyone else have that feeling? The shoot is on the left. Moreover, the plant is quite small for australis i am used to.

Regards

Adam

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Amazing ping photos! Interesting how diverse the flowers are-thank you for sharing those photos!

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Wahoo, although I suspected it to exist, that's the first time I saw a white flower of Pinguicula leptoceras. Could we have some more pictures of it?

On 22/09/2012 at 1:19 PM, Zlatokrt said:
The U. australis, does the flower belong to the plant above? I think i see a shoot only with bladders, like the shoots which produce affixed aquatic utrics (U. minor, ochroleuca, stygia etc.). I am thinking about U. minor in this case. Does anyone else have that feeling? The shoot is on the left. Moreover, the plant is quite small for australis i am used to.

Yes I agree, this one looks like a U. minor or U. bremii.

Regards

Edited by kisscool_38

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Thanks to all!

That must have been a really nice trip. All those ping flowers... I was in Italy too, near Belluno, but too late for the flowers.

I wonder, how often i missed P. leptoceras considering it only P. vulgaris. So far i have never seen on any of my trips to the Alps the real leptoceras. Or maybe i have seen it, but have not identify it correctly. Is there any easy, clear characteristic to distinguish these two?

The U. australis, does the flower belong to the plant above? I think i see a shoot only with bladders, like the shoots which produce affixed aquatic utrics (U. minor, ochroleuca, stygia etc.). I am thinking about U. minor in this case. Does anyone else have that feeling? The shoot is on the left. Moreover, the plant is quite small for australis i am used to.

Regards

Adam

Hi Adam.

For distinguish the two Pings is essential to have the flowers!

Inflorescence of P. leptoceras, how you can see in the photos, have the white spot that start out the throat of the flower.

While in P. vulgaris, spot start from the inside of throat.

This is the primary and easier difference!

For the question of U. australis, I'm sure that these in photos are australis... how I wrote, this summer was realy dry, and plants in that place suffered so much!

The flower that I photographed was malformed.

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Hello,

Regarding the identity of the Utricularia species on the two above photographs, the link to this thread was just sent to me by a friend from Slowenia, who used the photos for plant identification ;)

The vegetative shoot shown belongs to U. minor, the flower is that of U. stygia. It is not even malformed, but U. stygia quite often forms such a lower corolla lip, which is bent upwards at its lateral margins.

All the best,

Andreas

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Thanks a lot Diego! This sounds like an easy-to-distinguish characteristic.

You can also distinguish it by fruit shape. P. vulgaris as piriform capsule while P. leptoceras has round-shape seedpods.

The lower calyx lobes are also divided to the base and form a 90° angle in P. leptoceras.

However, it is not always simple and all characters have to be checked.

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