What plants are suitable?


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I'm an absolute beginner creating a bog garden in a "half-barrel" type wooden container. Diameter of container is 15 1/2" and 13" deep.

Only plants I have at the moment are 2 VFTs which have done well in pots outdoors, where I would like to position the bog garden eventually.

The location can get a tad windy occasionally, so I want hardy plants that will be OK in VFT compost, but not get too high.

Any suggestions gratefully received?

Thanks

Phil

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With the exception of the Cephalotus and Heliamphora, all of the plants in my grow list are grown outdoors. Most stay outdoors year-round, only the Sarracenia minor, S. psitticina, Drosera capensis, D. binata var. multifida f. extrema and filiformis are removed and spend their winter in an unheated (but sheltered) garage.

Haven't lost any plants to the winter in the past three years (touch wood!).

Hope this helps.

Howard

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Thanks for the reply Howard - unfortunately when I click your "Grow list" link, I get an error page containing "You do not have permission to view this topic."

It maybe because I only registered today - perhaps if Admin sees this they can confirm.

Phil

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Hi Phil,

It may be your recent registration is preventing you from viewing the growlist, or the link may be faulty (doesn't appear to be for me, but I don't know about others). In the meantime, here is the growlist:

Cheers,

Howard

PS And by the way 'Welcome!"

Cephalotus

  • follicularis

Darlingtonia

  • californica

Dionaea

  • muscipula (standard clone)
  • muscipula (giant trap erect form)
  • muscipula (large green form)
  • muscipula (red line form)
  • muscipula ('Royal Red' form)

Drosera

  • anglica
  • binata
  • binata var. multifida
  • binata var. multifida f. extrema
  • capensis (pale form)
  • capensis (typical form)
  • filiformis
  • filiformis var. tracyi
  • rotundifolia
  • binata var. multifida
  • nidiformis
  • intermedia
  • filiformis (all red form)

  • x hybrida
  • x beleziana

Heliamphora

  • nutans x heterodoxa

Pinguicula

  • grandiflora

Sarracenia

  • alata
  • flava
  • flava var. maxima
  • leucophylla
  • minor
  • minor 'Okefenokee Giant'
  • psittacina
  • purpurea subsp. purpurea
  • purpurea subsp. venosa var venosa
  • purpurea subsp. purpurea f. heterophylla
  • flava var. cuprea
  • flava var. ornata (F198)
  • flava var. ornata (Apalachicola National Forest) (F203)
  • flava var. rubricorpora (Giant red tube, Apalachicola National Forest) (F112)
  • flava var. rugelii (Milton, Florida)

  • x chelsonii
  • x catesbyi
  • x catesbyi var. heterophylla
  • x 'Juthatip Soper'
  • x moorei
  • x excellens
  • x harperi
  • x mitchelliana
  • x swaniana

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Some are - some aren't! It depends on what you want to grow and just how exposed your garden is. Our garden gets strong winds from time-to-time which can sometimes damage the plants, I've found that Gardman plant supports can help the tallest plants (such as the Sarracenia flava variants, S. leucophylla and some of the taller Sarracenia hybrids) but generally once the leaves finish developing and 'harden-off' wind isn't a big issue. The heavy rain and hail we've experienced here has done far more damage to the plants.

For low-growing plants consider: Venus' fly-traps, native sundews, native butterworts, Sarracenia purpurea, S. psitticina etc.

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Hi Phil

Similar to Howard all my plants stay outdoors, year round, in bogs, but I also leave my capensis, binata, minors, filliformis and psitts outside and whilst the capensis and binata always dies back to the roots they come back from the roots next year, admitedly they are behind indoor and greenhouse plants but they come through OK.

I wouldnt worry too much about the wind and tall plants, you can as Howard suggests always stake them and they do look give some height to a display, otherwise the only truely hardy sarracenia are the purpureas so any cross with purpurea in it should be fine, with most others being hardy to zone 8a so should survive all but the worst of winters. It is normally the constant freeze/thaw cycle that does for plants in containers having a small mass, or worse still is the desiccating wind in frozen conditions as the plant cannot replace the moisture lost from the foliage due to the frozen soil and dries out.

Cheers

Steve

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  • 1 month later...

With the exception of the Cephalotus and Heliamphora, all of the plants in my grow list are grown outdoors. Most stay outdoors year-round, only the Sarracenia minor, S. psitticina, Drosera capensis, D. binata var. multifida f. extrema and filiformis are removed and spend their winter in an unheated (but sheltered) garage.

Haven't lost any plants to the winter in the past three years (touch wood!).

Hope this helps.

Howard

I keep my Capensis, and psitticina outdoors all year too
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