A suitably-small Nepenthes


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Just a quick question: I'm looking to start growing Nepenthes but would want plants that remain compact over time as I am limited on the amount of space available for this purpose. I have a small terrarium that I'd be looking to use (30 x 30 x 80cm [w x d x h]). I seem to recall seeing a post about a fortnight ago of a small terrarium with N. ampullaria? that looked ideal... Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, also the names of any UK-based suppliers (of course, if this latter request contravenes forum rules on discussing dealers etc then please pm me).

Thanks in advance,

Howard

Edited by hmbluck
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I'm not very knowledgable with Neps but I do know that N. glabrata stays compact. I got mine from Hampshire Carnivores but I also see that one of our continental members has a decent sized one for sale at the moment, see the sales and wants thread.

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Hi,

I wouldn't start growing Nepenthes with a highland species. Nepenthes ampullaria gets quite big! A compact species from the lowlands would be N. campanulata, which also makes nice pitchers...

Anotherone would be N. gracilis!

For this small size of terrarium these are probably the best species which can stay in there for a long time!!! (Just google a bit about them)

Cheers and good growing

Marc

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  • 2 weeks later...

OK, so you have to choose between N. argentii (highland), N. campanuata (lowland) and. N. micramphora (intermediate - highland).

Also, a lot of ultra-highland nepenthes grow very slowly at the beginning for a few years.

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OK, so you have to choose between N. argentii (highland), N. campanuata (lowland) and. N. micramphora (intermediate - highland).

Also, a lot of ultra-highland nepenthes grow very slowly at the beginning for a few years.

Personally, if given the choice of being able to pick one of these, I'd grab a micramphora, since it would then be the only one in cultivation.

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Hi Howard,

maybe you are referring to my ampullaria? http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=46715

It may depend on the clone, some may indeed grow too big for a small tank. But for me it works fine - I posted my conditions and interpretations in the linked thread. So my ampullaria is by fat the most compact Nepenthes I ever grew.

Regards

Martin

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Marc S. - considering sizes, N. micramphora fit nicely ;)

I don't think that N. argentii is more difficult to grow than N. campanulata - I grow both species and each has it own sulk.

Well, I don't think that expressions "easy specie" and "small sizes for years" are compatible.

Lowlands? Lowlands in lowland conditions grow like crazy, much faster than highlands in highlander conditions.

Of course, if assured conditions are not ideal for a plant, it will grow slowly and stays small for a longer period of time. But this is not the way, we want to grow plants, right?

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Marc S. - considering sizes, N. micramphora fit nicely ;)

Well - there seems to be just some little bit of controvercy in this field ;-)

Well, I don't think that expressions "easy specie" and "small sizes for years" are compatible.

Ehm...why? Didn't get that, sorry.

Of course, if assured conditions are not ideal for a plant, it will grow slowly and stays small for a longer period of time. But this is not the way, we want to grow plants, right?

Well, I agree with the first sentence. But - no plant grown in a container in a conservatory or room or cellar will ever experience ideal conditions. While I too find it most satisfying to come at least as close to ideal conditions as possible, in some cases kind of compromise is allowable in my eyes. In case of my ampullaria, I see no greater signs of unhealthiness. So I don't feel too nasty to grow it like tjhat ;-)

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(after forum software uprade i still cannot edit my own post- there were some grammar mistakes above - sorry)

Martin,

I get your point and truly like your composition with N. ampullaria. But it seems that some other N. ampullaria clones were growing much faster in container conditions to be grown there for a longer period of time.

In my opinion, such steady growing species - always small and fairy easy to grown does not exist. My lowlands (including N. ampullaria) in tanks after 1 year were too big and I had to move them to the greenhouse. So I don't think that we can consider N. ampullaria or N. gracilis as a species generally staying small for years.

For "an easy to grow" I consider species, which can more or less be grown with some success on a windowsill.

I don't think that N. campanulata and N. argentii can be grown successfully, with no harm for the plant, on windowsill. Well, at least on european windowsill (of course, there are some exceptions).

What's more, I do think that you try to ensure your N. ampullaria the best conditions possible. Artificial light, high humidity, LFS, what's more N. ampullaria would demand? :) Speaking of not ideal conditions, I meant a situation, where some people consciously try to grow demanding species (like N. rajah, N. dubia etc) in their homes, even in tanks, but without any cooling. Such plants will probably vegetate for years and stay small for years.

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I would believe that the most suitable candidates are plants (i.e. clones, not necessarily species) that come from intermediate regions, maybe around 1500 m asl or so, where night and day temps are similar to our room temperature. Real lowlanders would need more heat, and real highlanders cooler nights as our room conditions can ensure.

So a lowland ampullaria wouldn't be the best choice I agree (mine is an intermediate form btw). A N. hamata would work - best in a closed tank, as it loves some higher humidity (though some have great success straight on a windowsill http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=20800&hl=hamata++windowsill) and stays compact too. And a fantasic species.

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