Cultivation of Drosera glanduligera


Recommended Posts

Hi everyone

I recently got seeds of Drosera glanduligera from ICPS seeds bank. And I would like to know the tips for the cultivation.

Actually it is the second opportunity for me to grow this drosera. My first try was about 3 years ago with only 20 seeds. One day in January I found 5 buds germinating one year after I had sewn the seeds. Then only 2 of them could grow, and I obtained about 50 seeds from them in May. However, an accident occurred (typhoon winds blew the pot!!) and I lost all the seeds after all.

In my very short experience, Drosera glanduligera seems to be very weak at hot weather and it probably was the cause I couldn't make all the plants grow. Anybody who successfully grows this drosera, please let me know how to grow Drosera glanduligera.

Best regards

Link to post
Share on other sites

For Northern Hemisphere: sow in June. Germination takes place after the first cool nights (>8-10°C) in October. Now keep very humid with night temps not higher than 5-8°C. Temp. down to 1°C is very good. If night temps. are above 8-10°C for some nights, they will flower too early and die soon. Day temps are best between 15-25°C. And you must feed the seedlings two times the week from the beginning with either living springtails (Collembola) or fine fishfood flakes, using a forceps with magnifier. This method is hard work, but successfully. The photo is from my collection, using the above method.

Drosera_glanduligera_2010_1web.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Everything that Siggi_Hartmeyer posted in his reply is very good advice and very true! I, too, have found that glanduligera does not like high temperatures and needs to be fed often in order to flourish.

My method for germinating this species is identical to tuberous drosera. Sow in June and leave the pot in a place that will experience high outdoor temperatures all summer long. Let them bake! Protect your sown pot from rain that might wash away the seeds. This can be under an eave, piece of furniture, etc.

Put the sown pot in a water tray in September. The soil should be constantly damp from this point onward. The seeds will start to germinate within a month after they have experience a prolonged period of cooler days and nights. A steep temperature drop at night (at least 15 degrees) will help them germinate.

In general my glanduligeras grow from October/November until after flowering in April/May.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Siggi_Hartmeyer

Thanks for your detailed information. It is really helpful! And What a beautiful photo it is! I hope I will grow my plants like them.

Through your method now I know temperature control is really important. During growing term in winter do you keep the plants in green house under temps controlled? And the idea of feeding plants is also something new for me!

Best Regard

For Northern Hemisphere: sow in June. Germination takes place after the first cool nights (>8-10°C) in October. Now keep very humid with night temps not higher than 5-8°C. Temp. down to 1°C is very good. If night temps. are above 8-10°C for some nights, they will flower too early and die soon. Day temps are best between 15-25°C. And you must feed the seedlings two times the week from the beginning with either living springtails (Collembola) or fine fishfood flakes, using a forceps with magnifier. This method is hard work, but successfully. The photo is from my collection, using the above method.

Drosera_glanduligera_2010_1web.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Tuberous D

Thanks so much for your method too! From now on I'll put my pots of D. glanduligera under scorching summer sun. Then during the hot term do you give some moist to the soil or should it be completely dried?

Best Regards

Everything that Siggi_Hartmeyer posted in his reply is very good advice and very true! I, too, have found that glanduligera does not like high temperatures and needs to be fed often in order to flourish.

My method for germinating this species is identical to tuberous drosera. Sow in June and leave the pot in a place that will experience high outdoor temperatures all summer long. Let them bake! Protect your sown pot from rain that might wash away the seeds. This can be under an eave, piece of furniture, etc.

Put the sown pot in a water tray in September. The soil should be constantly damp from this point onward. The seeds will start to germinate within a month after they have experience a prolonged period of cooler days and nights. A steep temperature drop at night (at least 15 degrees) will help them germinate.

In general my glanduligeras grow from October/November until after flowering in April/May.

Link to post
Share on other sites

D. glanduligera is growing together with my tuberous Drosera inside a cool greenhouse. I use an electrical frost protection to avoid that temps are dropping below freezing point. Last winter we had about -16°C outside, and the temps inside dropped down to 0.8°C. That night-conditions close to freezing point were also very good for the well growing tuberous species and also D. regia, D. arcturi and Drosophyllum. Due to low sunlight during winter, I add a 400W metal halide lamp for 9-10 hours per day to provide enough light, which is also important. And yes, without nutrition the plants can actually not develop healthy.

Edited by Siggi_Hartmeyer
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi thanks again. I'll probably put the pots of D. glanduligera with pigmy sundews together during winter. In my region the lowest temp. is more or less a freezing point. So it should be OK! Then I'll think of bringing artificial light system for the sake of low sunshine in winter.

D. glanduligera is growing together with my tuberous Drosera inside a cool greenhouse. I use an electrical frost protection to avoid that temps are dropping below freezing point. Last winter we had about -16°C outside, and the temps inside dropped down to 0.8°C. That night-conditions close to freezing point were also very good for the well growing tuberous species and also D. regia, D. arcturi and Drosophyllum. Due to low sunlight during winter, I add a 400W metal halide lamp for 9-10 hours per day to provide enough light, which is also important. And yes, without nutrition the plants can actually not develop healthy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Hey ihatov,

you are welcome, also my seedlings started again germinating with the first cold nights. Your report confirms that the changing temperature is an important trigger. The photos below show one of our new seedlings which caught a (relatively) large gnat. The catapulting tentacles are still not developed, but also the first sticky tentacles act really powerful. The first photo was shot November 26 and the second one on December 15. The small trap digested as much as possible and remained healthy without any mould.

Diva_Keimung-2012_Beute_Nov26_1web.jpg

Diva_Keimung-2012_Beute_Dez15_be.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Siggi_Hartmeyer

Happy new year. I wish you and your plants all the best.

My ones have also kept germinating since the beginning of December. I'd like to gain as many seedlings as possible for the purpose of harvesting seeds next spring.

I saw my seedlings catch small preys a couple of days ago. I'm amazed that such tiny insects still can survive in a cold weather. But yours seems to have caught larger insects than mine. Anyway I'm going to start feeding fish flake food to them very soon. And I'll keep informing you of mine.

8333709058_7e598eae40_q.jpg

A seedling of Drosera glanduligera by ihatov1001, on Flickr

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Sorry for putting up this old topic once again. It'll be the last..... I think.

As I followed the advice on this topic, I'd grown Drosera glanduligera since last summer. Then finally I could meet the flowers and harvest seeds out of them.

It was 4 April when I confirmed the first flower stalk. At that time the night temperature exceeded more or less 10 degrees Celsius. Then the first orange flower appeared exactly 10 days time although it seems to have already bloomed a couple of times. As I work, it was pretty hard to come across the flowers, which open for very limited time during day time of sunny day. And at the same time, the plants withered so quickly.

I collected the first mature seed pod on 11 May. And later I harvested more. I don't know how many but they are at least more than enough for the next season.

Thanks for all the advice above!

8909475093_4abe29d6b9_z.jpg

Drosera glanduligera 6 by ihatov1001, on Flickr

8909486441_5c5e55e598_z.jpg

Drosera glanduligera 7 by ihatov1001, on Flickr

8910115348_b27fe44918_z.jpg

Drosera glanduligera 8 by ihatov1001, on Flickr

8910121810_d3f94687d5_z.jpg

Drosera glanduligera 9 by ihatov1001, on Flickr

8909500407_f2ebbbda8b_z.jpg

Drosera glanduligera 10 by ihatov1001, on Flickr

Edited by ihatov1001
Link to post
Share on other sites

So now, there are about two people on Earth who can cultivate this species? Amazing how the seed has a reverse stratification...

Congratulations!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.