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The body snatcher pod

WOWWW! I have purchased a GIANT darlingtonia!

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If the plant losts whatever "it" is, well it just might be doomed...

I think the 'it' is called life.

Has anyone tried using man-made mycorrhizae produces on Darlingtonia?

I think you're barking up the wrong tree, I've never had to use products like this.

There again I believe that the black pot theory is rubbish too.

Pure peat is a no no and they're not that keen on peat / perlite mix either, yes they will grow but give the roots a choice of live sphagnum and peat / perlite and they stay in the live sphagnum.

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By the occasion, I will ask. Fred, do you think that if it is a good idea to plant a Darlingtonia on a growing Sphagnum moss, that has grown about 15-20 cm above the water level. The pot is in a closed water circulation system. The plant would have a whole 8-y.o. ecosystem where definitely grow some fungus. :D It will have flowing water, living sphagnum moss and I would like to leave it there for the winter too. :) Ah well... why not show a photo of the pot... here it is:

IMG_7403_zps1835d2f2.jpg

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Chris, this is my Colony No3. It's been in a gravel tray for a couple of seasons so it had to be planted up into a double tray.

8536471973_69b452e987_b.jpg

The tray will be flooded spring - autumn. No need for moving water or the plants being raised. The Darlingtonia are quite happy sitting in water.

8536472217_22d4e8ff83_b.jpg

Winter it is kept a little drier, maybe half full of water and freezes solid.

Edit :- As an afterthought I thought I should show you the results I expect from this method of growing.

The Mother Colony.

Spring

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The previous summer

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Junior Colony spring

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The previous summer

3707063421_fd2cd1cfce_z.jpg

Edited by FredG

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Fred, you have fantastic plants with no doubt. You also made me sure that I can leave this species to have some frosts. Question is how harsh? But I already have some conditions and pots. Instead of creating new ones I would prefer to use those which I have to the maximum. My question was if I could grow successfully Darlingtonia in that pot shown above in described conditions or rather not?

The way you are growing yours Darlngtonia is not foreign to me. I also thought of growing this species in mineral, gravely soil maybe with a bit of Sphagnum moss on the surface. It seems I weren't wrong. What type of gravel you use? I mean the type of rock.

(I also started searching for interesting plants accompanying CPs in the wild and in that case it is of course Cypripedium calofornicum. There is also some Platanthera sp., but I don't know which one yet.)

Sorry guys for continuing this off topic. I hope you don't mind. :(

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No rock Chris, that's just Sphagnum moss on 1" (2.5cm) of peat moss ( the peat is for the Sphagnum not the Darlingtonia). I use several species of Sphagnum, it looks better.

Minimum temperatures can be very low, -18C (0F) is not outrageous for these.

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Probably not until next year now, thinned them out and cut back already.

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So black pots, kept in hot ish conditions (greenhouse) and shallow depth of growing medium then. Sure does buck a lot of the percieved wisdom, but the results are undeniable not to mention outstanding Fred.

Cheers

Steve

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So black pots, kept in hot ish conditions (greenhouse) and shallow depth of growing medium then. Sure does buck a lot of the percieved wisdom, but the results are undeniable not to mention outstanding Fred.

My friend from UK used to grow her Darlingtonia in a greenhouse and according to her, it was more durable than any Sarracenia if it comes for heat. When all of the Sarracenias were withered from heat, the Darlingtonia was looking perfectly normal. So that is not that really surprising. :) Maybe that resistance to heat depends on having a specific clone or locant (used properly?). One might be more heat resistant than the others. Than it would depend on which one you simply get. Maybe it is just general lack (not your Steve) of understanding this plant. That would not be the first time...

I do not have much experience with this species myself, but I think that the biggest treat to this species is a roots fungal disease. It might depend on the temperature, yes, but as the experience of some shows, that might not be the real case. It might depend on the properties of the soil mix one use and than when it is not preferred by the plant, the triggering factor might be the high temperature.

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I do not have much experience with this species myself, but I think that the biggest treat to this species is a roots fungal disease. It might depend on the temperature, yes, but as the experience of some shows, that might not be the real case. It might depend on the properties of the soil mix one use and than when it is not preferred by the plant, the triggering factor might be the high temperature.

Is this just a gut feeling Chris? Can you back this up with some findings?

I think you got it right in the first part of your post.

Maybe it is just general lack (not your Steve) of understanding this plant. That would not be the first time...

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Is this just a gut feeling Chris? Can you back this up with some findings?

It is a little more like a personal observation of the way I lost a few of mine. The first information I read/heard about this species was that it has to have a cold soil, otherwise it will get a fungal infection and die fast. Because of that I was not allowing myself to have it, since I couldn't provide such condition. Than when I learned that it can grow perfectly in a greenhouse until it has much water I decided to try it. I lost the very first plants in a way which suggested me a fungal infection. Than I tried once more, with three plants. Quite fast one of my plants started wilting like the previous one. I cut all the "infected" parts, changed the soil and cleaned the plants roots. It grew a wile normally, even grew up a little when it got "it" again. This time I couldn't save it, I had nothing more to cut off. Than a second plant also got "the infection" and died. The third plant I gave away thinking I just don't know how to grow this species. I haven't thought that maybe the total change of soil type could help. I was using peat with sand in equal parts than. The peat was of a high quality.

I only thought of trying it once again after learning new things about this species. Living sphagnum moss. My choice was the pot I showed before, because as a mini ecosystem it has grater chance of preventing a morbific fungus from infecting the roots. I also found some photos from its wild habitat showing it growing on wet, black rocks. I also thought about trying it that way.

Keep them on the floor of the greenhouse in a tray of Sphagnum and you can't really go wrong.

I don't have a greenhouse and won't be able to have one any time soon.

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I grow my Darlingtonia also on the floor of my greenhouse in full sun al day long and in a black pot.

Today it was 42°C Celsius in my greenhouse.

But small heliamphora's with the juvenile pitchers doens't like this and they burn/dry out and die!

The bigger ones and especially my neblinaea even seems to like this!

Darlingtonia:

Got this one forum Pieter (Lucifer from this forum).

Al my other different Darlingtonia's also died without any reason.

This is the first Darlingtonia, that i can keep as a normal sarracenia!

It grows in pure peat...

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Heliamphora:

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Thanks,

I have some other clones too and they're all dying with this heat. Only the 2 that I selected from seed like the one from mark are doing fine now.

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My Siuslaw plant expired in the heat today, all others are fine. I've had trouble with large clones before, they seem to be a lot more fussy when it comes to heat...

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My Siuslaw plant expired in the heat today, all others are fine. I've had trouble with large clones before, they seem to be a lot more fussy when it comes to heat...

Yes exactly,

My bigger clones also died without any abviouse reasson!

Maybe someone knows a big clone the produces really high pitchers and also witstand the heat etc?

Edited by markde2e

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1. Has anyone any idea of the root temperatures that the plants are finding too much?

2. What do you mean by the bigger clones? What size is big?

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1. Has anyone any idea of the root temperatures that the plants are finding too much?

No. Standing in water tray with Sarras and other Darlingtonia. Greenhouse upto 35c.

2. What do you mean by the bigger clones? What size is big?

The 2 I have lost are Siuslaw and one from Mark Dunsford? Clones that are advertised as "giant", different location to commonly grown clones?. Rest of my Darlingtonia are absolutely fine at those temps

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I have a problem with the terms giant and commonly grown. I've had my main 'clone' for 30 years, I doubt it is commonly grown :D

As you know I have my Darlingtonia in the sun and root temperatures have been up to 32C+. There is a so called giant with the rest.

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Much better. You don't have the monopoly on being anally retentive Stephen :D

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