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The body snatcher pod

WOWWW! I have purchased a GIANT darlingtonia!

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Well, I know, I Know, there are bigger Darlings than this, but I am very suprised because of the size of the plant I just have recived this Saturday. I placed it next to commonly used items just to compare. Also there is a 30cm rule. You can see the bigger pitcher almos reach 50 cm!! I found price very reasonable and cheap. (25euro) It was selled as 20.30cm Darlingtonia, but the plant is much bigger than they claim!!!

WOW!! It´s fantastic!!! Click to enlarge.

P1390864.jpg

P1390863.jpg

:training1:

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This is good news I was already thinking of buying from Carnivoria but now I am sure to buy to buy from them :yes: ,did you get other plants from them?

Simon :D

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This is good news I was already thinking of buying from Carnivoria but now I am sure to buy to buy from them :yes: ,did you get other plants from them?

Simon :D

Nop! Just the Darling. But some friends did. They were generally happy, but Carnivoria has mistaken a few deliveries for some persons last week. Have to say that they are sending the right plants to them without additional costs .

Sizes: common plants like Sarras or Darlings are pretty big, but if you go for Heliamphora foliculata, you get a juvenile plant. If you ask for an adult one, its about 60 euro or more. The good thing is you allways can write him to ask about plants sizes, prices an so.

Dellivery spends are cheap to. Five euro for me.

Edited by The body snatcher pod

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Nop! Just the Darling. But some friends did. They were generally happy, but Carnivoria has mistaken a few deliveries for some persons last week. Have to say that they are sending the right plants to them without additional costs .

Sizes: common plants like Sarras or Darlings are pretty big, but if you go for Heliamphora foliculata, you get a juvenile plant. If you ask for an adult one, its about 60 euro or more. The good thing is you allways can write him to ask about plants sizes, prices an so.

Dellivery spends are cheap to. Five euro for me.

Ok,thanks for the info :D

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Hello,

After i red your topic, i also orderred a darlingtonia form carnivoria!

I got the plant today, biggest pitcher is almost 40CM, not bad :pleasantry:

See:

163764053da48f2f83b5731fce27ae633bb8f8bd.jpg

16376406cf59c1aa3db5dcc6330ceafc0263638e.jpg

Edited by markde2e

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Hello,

After i red your topic, i also orderred a darlingtonia form carnivoria!

I got the plant today, biggest pitcher is almost 40CM, not bad :pleasantry:

See:

163764053da48f2f83b5731fce27ae633bb8f8bd.jpg

16376406cf59c1aa3db5dcc6330ceafc0263638e.jpg

Hi!

Nice plant! How is she doing? Mine not very well... all aerial part died very quikly through this summer. Don´t know why. My other darling, a little one i have for a year is still doing fine. But the big one absolutely no. Roots seem to be alive, but all folliage died.

Edited by The body snatcher pod

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Mine is doing very good!

Hasn't produced any large pitchers though...

It's been growing in pure peat with a shelow saucer of water beneth..

Edited by markde2e

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Mine does not recover. Don´t know why. A friend of mine who lives near me also bought another Darling at the same time as me, and happened the same. The plant started to seem more and more burned and not making new pitchers.

I grow mine in pure Sphagnum and top watered with rainwater.

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Mine does not recover. Don´t know why. A friend of mine who lives near me also bought another Darling at the same time as me, and happened the same. The plant started to seem more and more burned and not making new pitchers.

I grow mine in pure Sphagnum and top watered with rainwater.

Hello,

As for me, I also ordered a large Darlingtonia. Nowadays it isn't in good condition, so it is dying... I don't know why, because the conditions are suitable for the plant. I grow mine in pure peat and watered with rainwater.

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It could be for a couple of reasons that your plant has/is dying.

Firstly it could have got too hot, and the soil temperature has got too hot,it is in a black pot that will absorb heat very quickly.

Secondly there was a lot of pitchers and not many roots,at least from the picture you showed,The pitchers will lose a lot of water through transpiration/evaporation and this might not be replaced fast enough by a small root system on a recently divided plant.

Causing the pitchers to die back.

If the roots are still alive,i would put it in a cool shady place and keep it moist until spring.

ada

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Well, I planted it in a big planter (with some sarrs) and in live sphagnum. Don´t think is a soil overheating issue. But you are right about the short roots compared with the very long leaves.. May be the main fact in my case.

Anyway, unfortunately my plant is now dead... very very dead. I digged the roots a few days ago and they were totally brown and dead.

Ah! I don´t know what happens with me and Darlings...

It could be for a couple of reasons that your plant has/is dying.

Firstly it could have got too hot, and the soil temperature has got too hot,it is in a black pot that will absorb heat very quickly.

Secondly there was a lot of pitchers and not many roots,at least from the picture you showed,The pitchers will lose a lot of water through transpiration/evaporation and this might not be replaced fast enough by a small root system on a recently divided plant.

Causing the pitchers to die back.

If the roots are still alive,i would put it in a cool shady place and keep it moist until spring.

ada

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I had the same problem, i tried it several times with tissue culture Darlingtonia's, all from the same supplier. But they always died for no reason..

I also bought a small 'red' version of Darlingtonia from Zenflora.co.uk, this was one week later then i ordered the darlingtonia from carnivoria.eu.

But this one also died for no reason!

Here the same plant that u guys have/had, bought this one 20 july from carnivoria, it's doing fine now, hope it stays that way!:

(It has a flower bud inside the rhizome, so in should flower next year!).

16822245f7ba79393325b138e3268ef634d7bb40.jpg

16822289a8c73745341d7040b6a23b4aa4baa913.jpg

16822290424bd45d43e821ba849bf4fe242a3ff9.jpg

But the new pitchers are much smaller in comparing to the large one that it has already when i bought it...

So i think either 'Ada' is right and the roots in comparing to the size of plant were not that much, beqause the plant has been sepparate from the mother plant too quick.

Or Darlingtonia only make big pitchers in the beginning of the year!

Edited by markde2e

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Both the reasons you state are probably the cause Mark.Darlingtonia always produce the biggest pitcher first,that is the first new pitcher each year and it was probably still attached to the mother plant via a stolon and was separated when you ordered it.

They still get a lot of nutrients from the stolon via the mother plant and only grow a few roots to anchor themselves the first year or so.

ada

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Okay, did not know that, about Darlingtonia thank you!

Ps. I noticed the same is with my S.flava var. rubricorpora.

First pitchers were huge, and the second pitchers were tiny!

Leucophylla does the opposite it seems.. :yes:

Edited by markde2e

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My Darlingtonia also died suddenly for no reasson! :shout:

16901443449e9d6b64bd0cf50a8be55ff4b6ab78.jpg

I realy realy don't get these plants!

Edited by markde2e

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Hey, just wanted to pipe in here. Firstly, a darlingtonia will shoot up a huge pitcher each year in spring before shooting up smaller ones for the rest of the year. They are found mainly in a habitat where there is cold water constantly flowing through their roots. Using black plastic pots and pure peat is a bad idea as it'll cause the roots to overheat. Black pot absorbs heat and the plastic prevents evaporative cooling, the peat will eventually compact resulting in heat retention. On top of that, the compact peat will prevent aeration which will eventually suffocate the roots, but if the plants died off within the first couple of weeks, maybe it's because it wasn't acclimatized to it's new habitat and the change was too sudden? A way to help reduce the amount of stress the plant has to go through, you may want to cut off the older leaves. Anyway,I hope you guys have better luck next time.

God bless,

Aaron

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If your plants died suddenly, they died from a roots fungus infection. I lost two of my three plants once. They were growing perfectly fine, even flowered some time earlier and than one just died. Without any reason. All were grown in the same conditions, same water, and two even in the same pot. The third one, separate one died first. Than one of the two in one pot. But one lived unharmed. I remember that I was powerless to stop them from dying. No fungicide helped. Only once When it just started I cut off the dying plant but I had more than one growing cone and I could do that at all. But the plant eventually died after another infection after quite some time. The third plant I sold, being afraid that it will just die and maybe I am doing something wrong. I learned that what was the cause after talking with one of my friends some years after that when I already had no Darligtonia. This plant is just not easy and it seems it is prone to fungus infections. It might be a good idea to grow it in just pure Sphagnum moss. Because as much as I know, in a living Sphagnum moss, fungus infections occur a load less. But I haven't experimented with that myself yet. It is just read knowledge.

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Hi Cephalotus,

I think you mean a fungal desease called "fusarium". It infects de uppert parts of the roots system and blocks the water pasages, so the aereal part of the plants starts to wrinkle and dehydrate quickly. And in a few days, the whole plant is dead. I had some cases this summer, in spite of growing my plants in live Sphagnum.

But is not the case of my Darling. I purchased it in mid summer, planted it in pure Sphagnum, but the plant didn´t do anything. Just hardly surviving. No new growth, and the mature leaves decaying very slowly during the summer. But not the same way as if the plant was infected with fussarium. I remeber that the plant remained alive and mostly green several month, but refused to grow. And finally died very slowly...

If your plants died suddenly, they died from a roots fungus infection. I lost two of my three plants once. They were growing perfectly fine, even flowered some time earlier and than one just died. Without any reason. All were grown in the same conditions, same water, and two even in the same pot. The third one, separate one died first. Than one of the two in one pot. But one lived unharmed. I remember that I was powerless to stop them from dying. No fungicide helped. Only once When it just started I cut off the dying plant but I had more than one growing cone and I could do that at all. But the plant eventually died after another infection after quite some time. The third plant I sold, being afraid that it will just die and maybe I am doing something wrong. I learned that what was the cause after talking with one of my friends some years after that when I already had no Darligtonia. This plant is just not easy and it seems it is prone to fungus infections. It might be a good idea to grow it in just pure Sphagnum moss. Because as much as I know, in a living Sphagnum moss, fungus infections occur a load less. But I haven't experimented with that myself yet. It is just read knowledge.

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Umm, I think there is more going on than we think we know here... The Darlingtonia probably need something to help their roots. Perhaps a more specific kind of mycorrhizae or something similar. If the plant losts whatever "it" is, well it just might be doomed...

Has anyone tried using man-made mycorrhizae produces on Darlingtonia?

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