Carnivorous plants in the wild - UK


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There are sundews and butterworts throughtout much of the Scottish highlands. Drainage ditches by dirt tracks often have a lot of drosera rotundifolia. I find for the most variety in Scotland you have to go north of the Great Glen fault though.

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Loads of P. vulgaris and D. rotundifolia here in Snowdonia (North Wales). There are a few spots with U. australis and (I've been told) some U. minor and some more sundews.

I guess there are quite a few spots around the UK, depends where you were thinking of going.

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Loads of P. vulgaris and D. rotundifolia here in Snowdonia (North Wales). There are a few spots with U. australis and (I've been told) some U. minor and some more sundews.

I guess there are quite a few spots around the UK, depends where you were thinking of going.

Where abouts in Snowdonia?

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Hi there

Dorset and the New Forest are very good spots. The following species can be seen here:

Drosera anglica

Drosera intermedia

Drosera rotundifolia

Drosera x obovata

Drosera x beliziana

Sarracenia purpurea

Dionaea muscipula

Pinguicula lusitanica

Pinguicula vulgaris

Utricularia bremii

Utricularia intermedia

Utricularia minor

Utricularia stygia

PM me if you would like any location details.

Cheers, and have a sunny weekend

Andy

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Where abouts in Snowdonia?

Ive seen Drosera on Snowdon itself. For exact location;

When you walk up the miners track just as you have crossed the causeway that takes you over Llyn Llydaw (the small NE section of the lake), on the next bend leave the track and start walking up the hill towards the Pyg track and you will see them growing in the grass there. I was suprised to see them as it wasnt that boggy.

Edited by mantrid
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This got me curious as to where I saw them (It must have been over 5 years now) so I looked at google maps. And my original location in my previous post looks wrong as it looks too dry and rocky there (single blue balloon on the map below) Its more likely to be where the trio of balloons are, as I saw them while climbing the slope from the miners to the Pyg track, and the areas I marked looks greener and boggier and I remember it being quite lush compared to the rest of the mountain.

https://maps.google.co.uk/maps/ms?msid=207517044262368900676.0004c0dab2fe2a4f9ed61&msa=0&ll=53.075381,-4.042464&spn=0.00504,0.009645

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Where abouts in Snowdonia?

Loads of places. As Mantrid said there are plenty on Snowdon itself, just keep looking in damp clumps of shagnum next to the track for d. rotundifolia. Loads on the Watkin Path, it's also one of the best routes up Snowdon and even the short walk to Gladstone Rock is stunning and worth doing if you want a bit of a stroll. There are pings there as well. The Ogwyn valley has some good spots as well, and Newborough Warren (not far from the beach) on Anglesey has more P. vulgaris then I've ever seen anywhere else before. Cors Goch nature reserve is a good spot, plenty of pings, drosera and some utrics. Cors Erddreiniog is next to it, have only found d. rotundifolia there but it's a good place if you like wild adders and other beasties.

If you're up here feel free to PM me if you want some more information on where to look, but if you're out walking in the hills chances are you'll find plenty on your own.

Cheers,

Mark

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  • 3 years later...

You get sundews and pinguicula all over the place in Snowdonia, were you thinking of doing some walking in the area or just looking for plants? There are usually quite a few on the Watkin Path going up Snowdon itself, which is a pretty beautiful place to visit anyway but it does get a bit busy. Lots of Pings in the Ogwen Valley at the bottom of the Glyders as well which are right by the main road. A few sundews there too.

 

I guess they should be out by now, I saw my first D. rotundifolia of the year coming off the Nantlle Ridge a few weeks ago. 

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Culmstock in East Devon has D rotundafolia, D intermedia and P lusitanica. I'd be happy to act as a guide if you want?

Alex.

That would be great. Are they fairly easy to get to (ie no major hills etc) as my wife has problems walking long distances. We are down in Cornwall 11th July.

 

Ady

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You get sundews and pinguicula all over the place in Snowdonia, were you thinking of doing some walking in the area or just looking for plants? There are usually quite a few on the Watkin Path going up Snowdon itself, which is a pretty beautiful place to visit anyway but it does get a bit busy. Lots of Pings in the Ogwen Valley at the bottom of the Glyders as well which are right by the main road. A few sundews there too.

 

I guess they should be out by now, I saw my first D. rotundifolia of the year coming off the Nantlle Ridge a few weeks ago. 

We're not into doing long walks as my wife has major back pain, but we would like to see some carnivorous plants growing wild. If there was somewhere that we could get to without a long walk that would be great.

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You get sundews and pinguicula all over the place in Snowdonia, were you thinking of doing some walking in the area or just looking for plants? There are usually quite a few on the Watkin Path going up Snowdon itself, which is a pretty beautiful place to visit anyway but it does get a bit busy. Lots of Pings in the Ogwen Valley at the bottom of the Glyders as well which are right by the main road. A few sundews there too.

I guess they should be out by now, I saw my first D. rotundifolia of the year coming off the Nantlle Ridge a few weeks ago.

I went there yesterday but just walked to the top from by the train station,not sure wich route it was but never seen no CP's, is ogwen valley on snowden itself. I want to return sometime this week purposly to see my 1st wild plants. Thanks for all the info

Dan

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  • 3 months later...

Went to Wareham Forest last week to see the S. purpurea.

 

Went last year and noticed other Sarracenia had been planted - flava, leucophylla and some hybrids. Got a video of them on some device somewhere.

 

Anyway, this year most have gone or were doing really badly in those conditions. 

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