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Daniel O.

A strange looking D. spiralis

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Hi all,

i grow i big number of mature D. spiralis (graminifolia) from ´Itacambira´ and ´Diamantina´ and most of them are in flower at the moment but this one is really strange, it´s a form from ´Itacambira´. First of all it´s a very compact and robust plant, since a few months it started to produce a big number of side shots (all the others don´t do it). The leafes are about 20cm long but several of them are branching in the upper part of the leafes, really strange.

Furthermore the flower scapes do have a big number of tentacles in the upper part (relatively small leafes with tentacles between the flowers), even the sepals do have a big number of tentacles.

All my other D. spiralis look absolutely "normal".

Here are some pictures from two weeks ago.

P1230324a.jpg

Here several side shots are visible

P1230309a.jpg

Here you can see the development of a 3 forked leaf (in the left part of the picture)

P1230301a.jpg

P1230376a.jpg

P1230492a.jpg

the hole plant

P1230328a.jpg

Here you can see some of the tentacles on the developing flower scape and some of the folked leafes

P1230340a.jpg

P1230378a.jpg

P1230357a.jpg

P1230371a.jpg

And some flowers, it´s a three forked flower scape and here is a one of the small leaves with tentacles visible.

P1230738a.jpg

some mutant flowers

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here the tentacles are clearly visible, even on the petals

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This flower is from the small plant which sprouted out of the roots some time ago, it also has these tentacles on the sepals.

P1240182a.jpg

What do you think about these strange tentacles?

Best regards,

Dani

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Wahoo! Nice hybrid between Drosera graminifolia and Drosera binata. Congrats Daniel :tu:

To be serious, this is a fasciation process: several leaves are partially fused together, flower scapes quite entirely... This is the same phenomenom on Drosera capensis 'Crêtées' (crested in english). This is mostly due to viruses. Some Dionaea also do that, I know a population of Pinguicula vulgaris where most of the plants do that.

Edited by kisscool_38

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D. filiformis can behave in a similar way. It would be interesting if this were heritable.

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@Aymeric, i remember you have shown here last year some pictures of these strange P. vulgaris in one of my postings about the double flower of my P. caerulea.

A virus, hmm, in this case you are talking about the forked leafes and the fused flowers?

But what about the tentacles on the sepals and the small leafes with tentacles between the flowers?

@Khelljuhg and Will, till now i have not seen such a phenomenom in the case of D. filiformis, do you have any pictures?

@Adam, i have nothing against these offsprings, it looks really great.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hi Daniel,

I saw folked leafes in a big quantity of plants in habitat in last setember in Diamantina (Minas Gerais Expedition),

I saw this big bunch of flowers in this location and others too, but I didn't saw something like this abnormal flower.

This plant produce viable seeds?

Regards.

Carlos.

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@Adam, of course it would be very nice, for the moment it´s the only plant which does it. In a few months hopefully i will have a nice cluster of plants. :smile:

@Carlos, so these forked leafes also occur in nature. Have you taken some pictures of such leafes on your last Minas Gerais expedition?

I really wonder why these tentacles are there.

And yes, this plant does produce viable seed. :yes:

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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From different topic:

As for variation: Errr, have you ever checked the level of radioactive radiation in your surrounding? :wink: Perhaps that´s the reason for so many mutations...*duck and run*

yeah.... radioactive radiation level can be to high. first p.pumila than drosera...... Take care for yourself.

or maybe it's too late. Check out if you haven't somewhere third growing hand or something.

I'm serious ;-P

Greetings,

Pawel

Edited by Paweł Król

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@Carlos, so these forked leafes also occur in nature. Have you taken some pictures of such leafes on your last Minas Gerais expedition?

I really wonder why these tentacles are there.

I will look in my pictures. :yes:

And yes, this plant does produce viable seed.

The 'sons' have these forked leaves?

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Many thanks Earl. :yes:

@Pawel, nice quotation.

Till now i´m OK but a third growing hand would be really useful. :biggrin:

@Carlos, it would be really nice if you could find some pictures with forked leafes.

The "sons" are still too small, this plant started to produce these forked leafes when it was adult and flowered for the first time two years ago. And the interesting thing about these leafes is that they are mainly produced before and while flowering.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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This sounds like a sport mutation. It might not be inheritable via seed, just through division. Depends on whether it is a genetic mutation (inheritable) or a mutation in the way the genes are read--a one time change that doesn't affect the genes themselves.

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Hi Dani,

Beautiful plant you have there!

But some features you showed are not that uncommon! D. spiralis quite often have small leaves along the scape (with stipules and everything), and the tentacles on the sepals is a common characteristic of this species (one of the several that distinguishes it from true D. graminifolia).

Here some photos:

IMG_8346.JPG

Drosera%2520spiralis%2520%2528125%2529.JPG

BUT, fused leaves and lateral shoots are not that common! :wink:

In our last trip to Minas Gerais we found lots of mutant plants, including some very nice ones with the sepals completely transformed into "normal" leaves! Here some photos by Adilson:

DSC03599.JPG

DSC03600.JPG

Cheers,

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Wow, many thanks for showing these pictures Paulo, also many thanks to Adilson for his pictures.

These are really freaky flower scapes :shock: , somehow unbelievable. They look very interesting. It must be really dangerous for insects to pollinate these flowers. :smile:

Till now i have not seen any tentacles on the sepals or small leafes in the upper part of the flower scapes on the CP photofinder, that was the reason why i thought that it could be uncommon.

You mentioned that these tentacles on the sepals are common for D. spiralis in contrast to D. graminifolia but all my other 9 adult plants (nearly the same size but not that compact in growth) do not show these characteristics.

Last year this plant had some tentacles on the sepals but the number has been much smaller in comparison to this year.

Could it depend on the size, age or compactness of the plants?

And again, many thanks for sharing these pictures.

Best regards,

Dani

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Incredible! Looks like plants from outer space.

Could someone clearly explain the differences between Drosera graminifolia and Drosera spiralis please?

Edited by kisscool_38

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Wow, pretty interesting flowers. Sepals transformed into "normal" leaves? I have never seen something like that before on any other Drosera!

Adam

PS: I would be interested in D. spiralis vs. graminifolia characteristic too :-)

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@Khelljuhg and Will, till now i have not seen such a phenomenom in the case of D. filiformis, do you have any pictures?

This link has a couple of photos of a freaky D. filiformis:

http://sky.ap.teacup.com/happygrowing/239.html

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In a new article really soon!

Aaah, good news. :thumbsup:

@Khelljuhg, many thanks for the link, the first picture is indeed very similar in comparison to the third picture Paulo showed, very interesting.

Best regards,

Dani

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