Sign in to follow this  
Daniel O.

P. pumila flower show

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

some time ago my P. pumila flowered and i must say that i have never seen such a variaty concerning the flowers.

I received it as P. pumila "white flower" ´Seminole Co., Florida, USA´ but in fact only one plant had a pure white flower.

At the beginning i was able to take some pots out of the little terrarium for taking pictures, later it didn´t work anymore without damaging anything.

P1160214a.jpg

P1160297a.jpg

P1160109a.jpg

P1160122a.jpg

P1160130a.jpg

my favourite

P1160236a.jpg

P1160576a.jpg

P1160571a.jpg

P1160320a.jpg

P1160330a.jpg

P1160308a.jpg

P1160573a.jpg

P1160310a.jpg

P1160314a.jpg

P1160318aa.jpg

P1160305a.jpg

P1160334a.jpg

P1160335a.jpg

Sorry for the big number of pictures.

I hope you like them.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Andreas Eils

Dani, this subject must have been a thread you started! :wink:

Erm...as far as I can see you have far too many of this species and there is also a serious lack of space visible, so, you should send two or three pots to me!!!! :yes:

As for variation: Errr, have you ever checked the level of radioactive radiation in your surrounding? :wink: Perhaps that´s the reason for so many mutations...*duck and run*

Wonderful, Dani, really wonderful! I like your favourite muchly as well but also the pure white flower! Tell your Pings my best regards!

Bye

Andreas

BTW: The Tomentosas you sent me are growing! :good2:

Edited by Andreas Eils

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ill take one of each clone :) Please start reproducing them!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is one nice collection of pumila clones :thumbsup: I am always glad to see lots and lots of nice CP photos! (With CP i meant pings, dews and utrics of course :angel: )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many thanks to all of you. :yes:

@Andreas, perhaps you are really right about the radioactive radiation, here are some more mutants. :biggrin:

P1160595a.jpg

P1160598a.jpg

P1160299a.jpg

P1160302a.jpg

@Megs, reproducing these clones is not that easy because this species normally is an annual species, so you have to sow them out each year. Also you have to pollinate the flowers, otherwise no seed will be produced. It´s interesting to see if there will be again such a big variation next year.

Best regards,

Dani

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the mutant flowers to the normal!

They look great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always find it amazing to observe the incredible amount of variation in the flowers of Pinguicula species, even within the same population.

THANKS!!!

Fernando

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Andreas Eils
@Andreas, perhaps you are really right about the radioactive radiation, here are some more mutants.

:blink:

Dani, are you bald or do you still have hair?

:biggrin:

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderfull, only missing the yellow form....

Thanks for sharing Daniel.

No doubts that you are the european specialist grower of the south-eastern USA Pinguicula.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you would need to make a lot of cross polination including all colors. It should also be possible to line breed them in different colors?

Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again many thanks for the kind words. :yes:

@Martin, i will try to seperate some clones, hopefully it will work. Cross polination is always better than selfing them.

@Eric, many many thanks, how are your plants doing? I hope you have had germination.

Yes, the yellow form is for sure very intersting, isn´t it P. pumila var. bushwelli?

But till now i have not heard that anybody has it in cultivation.

@Andreas, till now everything is OK with me, no problems with losing my hair. :thumbsup:

@Fernando, yes, this big variety is really incredible. Is it in any other species as big as in this case?

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Carlos,

no in fact it´s an easy grower in comparison to the other US Pinguicula.

About 6-8 months after sowing the plants start to flower, but most plants are dying after flowering or are even flowering to death so in fact you have to pollinate them in time to receive some seed for the next season.

Best regards,

Dani

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Carlos,

till now i have not tried leaf cuttings because i had enough plants.

I have often read that leaf cuttings should not work in the case of the northeast US Pinguicula but this information is simply not the truth.

In the past i tried it with P. ionantha and P. lutea and it worked.

So it should also work with P. pumila.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, on annual species it is quite impossible to make cuttings. I don't know the exact reason, but leaves separated from the plants are always dying really fast.

Edited by kisscool_38

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Aymeric,

i would have expected that it should work because the leafes are fleshy like the leafes of the other northeast US Pinguicula, perhaps i will try it next time.

BTW, leaf cuttings of P. sharpii have worked in the past nethertheless it´s also an annual species but i have to admit that in this case it´s better to propagate them by using seed.

Best regards,

Dani

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this