D. dielsiana


jimscott
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Hi Jim,

I can't make out much of any details, but unless you got the seed directly from a population of D. dielsiana in South Africa, then you most certainly do not have D. dielsiana, but rather a form of D. natalensis or a hybrid with D. natalensis.

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From a couple years ago, i took these pictures of what came to me as D. natalensis:

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and these were supposed to be D. dielsiana, from a different plant:

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..why do I get the feeling that all I have had has been D. natalensis....

Edited by jimscott
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Ah, I think your "natalensis" might actually be D. venusta. D. venusta is very closely related to D. natalensis, but seems to be different in that several features are exaggerated, especially regarding the flowers. See how thick the flower stem is? This is normal for D. venusta, whereas a thinner stem is normal for D. natalensis.

The flower stems are very glandular and hairy on D. v., less so on D. n.. The styles divide fewer times in D. n.--similar to the difference between D. binata and D. multifida leaves. The lamina of D. v. is a bit wider than in D. n.. D. v. flower stems can grow nearly twice the height of D. n flower stems...

Edited by Dave Evans
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Hi Jim,

Maybe you need a couple different species, eh? Don't trade for or buy D. dielsiana though, you will get another D. natalensis. I've got a bunch of seed just waiting for someone to take them off my hands...

Over the years, I've heard many times D. capensis and Utricularia subulata described as weeds which jump into neighboring pots. Don't get me wrong, D. capensis has jumped a couple of times in twenty years, but it's not that consistent. But, the species which constantly hop pots are D. natalensis, D. spatulata and U. rostrata.

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*re-reads response* I'd be happy to take some seeds off your hands.... or work out a more comprhemsive trade arrangement! D. natalensis, or whatever I have, does indeed end up in multiple pots, along with D. capensis, U. subulata, and oddly enough D. indica.

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Hey Jim,

That plant is likely from the seeds i was spreading around that i received from triffid nurseries as "D. dielsiana ssp. "Transvaal"." Apparently some growers have re-labeled as D. snyderi and others think might be a mis-labeled hybrid of Nidiformis or something... but anyway, i might recommend calling it D. snyderi or "D. nidiformis hybrid" for now, since it was suggested for me to do so a while back.

for some reason, the images can't be posted, but here are the links:

http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/dielsiana/ssp_Trasnvaal/Drosera_dieslsiana_transvaal_post.JPG

http://www.growsundews.com/sundews/dielsiana/Dielsiana_ssp_'Transvaal'_med.JPG

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The published combination for D. x snyderi is D. dielsiana * D. nidiformis.

However, I'm thinking the hybrid actually is D. natalensis * D. nidiformis.

D. nidiformis used to be known as "sp. Transvaal".

This photo appears to depict D. x synderi.

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Edited by Dave Evans
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Hi,

none of the plants here seems to be D. dielsiana to me. As long as you did not get seeds or plants from highly reliable sources (i can only think of two or three persons) the chance you have D. dielsiana are almost down to 0. I still have to see the first plants of that species in cultivation.

Christian

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