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Martin Hingst

Cephalotus follicularis near Walpole, WA

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Hello,

one of the most exciting plants we saw in WA was for sure Cephalotus.

The site was a sandy cliff near Walpole, where the plants grew directly at the vertical cliffwall.

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The plants were not easy to find because fully overgrown with vegetation (and therefore mostly green in colour) and difficult to reach in 2-4 m height at the wall. It took me quite some time to find a suitable spot to prepair a little path, so my two ladies could safely follow.

First interesting plant I saw was this beautiful spider orchid. Not bad for the beginning!

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Strange beauty, isn't it?

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But so far no Cephalotus. Instead some beautiful Drosera pulchella.

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In fact those pulchella were my guides to finallly find the desired plants. A first pitcher covered in the grasses turned out to be a huge group of pitchers:

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Many plants were green, but even those pitchers had red peristomes and colourful markings at the lids:

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Here another impression of the habitat - Vera got a good shot, with Cephalotus in front of me, the sea below, and sleepy Ilva on the back :wink:

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Nice plant at a very scenic spot!

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Hope you like it -

Martin

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GORGEOUS !!! :heart:

Many thanks for sharing so beautiful pictures !

It always a pleasure for me to see pictures of cephalotus in the wild. Those ones are fantastic !!!

:Laie_71mini:

Many many thanks !!!

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Hi Martin,

really very nice pictures, thanks for sharing.

For sure you have had a nice time while you have been there with your family.

Best regards,

Daniel

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Thanks :smile: yes, it is really thrilling to find them in habitat. And good that it wasn't too easy... well I remember we came to the site late in the afternoon, and I had a very good - but some years old - location description. So the plan was to get to the plants, use the last half an hour of sunlight to make some photos in the setting sun, have a beer and chill. So I got my camera, two cans of Emu Export, some additional lenses for the sundown and scenery, and went on... How snobby is that :wink: but I got my rightful punishment :biggrin:

Well, the cliff where the expected plants should grow had long come down, I had to move further and further, without finding anything! Long after sunset I finally had to give up and hardly found a way back to where I had started.

Next day it took me three attempts to reach a promising part of the cliff and some more hours to succeed - but thats the better way of course!

Edited by Martin Hingst

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It's always more rewarding when you have to work for it! A really interesting series of reports and photography ... cheers!

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Hi Martin

when I was there 6 years ago there were thousands of cephalotus on the cliff along with many sundews. The beach was around 3 metres deep and in some cases part of the cliff had fallen onto the beach but cephs were still growing on the fallen rocks. I guess that cephs are quite salt tolerant.

A local contact told me that they had had significant problems with plants being stolen but that the numbers increase again in a few years.

Thanks for the great photos.

Dennis

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I have a ceph which I call Walpole clone as it is decendant from a plant taken from that region. It's vigorous and like the Phil Mann clone doesn't colour up much in full sun as compared to other Cephs.

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Yes Earl - exciting fits, esp. up to the first find!

Sorry to hear that Dennis, I thought the plants were lost due to the collapse of the cliff at that edge. Maybe a mixture of both. Something similar I've heard recently about the type location of D. citrina... cannot really understand this, as these plants are so easily available commercially.

Luckily there are many locations even more difficult accessible and less known - better to keep the secrets.

Regards

Martin

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Sometimes it is indeed better keeping secrets. Sad when populations decline because of poaching and of course the unfortunate doings of mother nature.

Still, very nice pictures you have shown, i really appreciate it!

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Thanks for sharing, I would love to see Cephalotus in habitat. Any idea what the blue flowers in the first picture are?

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This is the first time I've seen good wild Ceph pics with perspective to a person next to it and a river...Very cool images indeed!! Thanks for sharing...

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Dexter - the "river" is actually an inlet, so more the sea than a river.

Carl, most probably a Dampiera, of the Goodeniaceae family, that is full of plants in incredible colours. Reminds me that I wanted to write a topic on the Lechenaultia plants... if you like colours, that should be interesting for you. Maybe tonight.

Regards

Martin

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