Nepenthes peltata


Simon Lumb
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Hi,

Just a quick question to all growers of this species. I have a few small seed grown seedlings of this species none of which exhibit the peltate characteristic that presumably contributed to naming of this species. I am not too disappointed yet since my plants are still very small; however, I have looked at several photos of plants in cultivation for this feature and to honest I struggled to see any peltate plants. For those growers that do have a specimen exhibiting the correct charateristics, what stage in the growth development does the peltate tendril appear. In N.rajah for example this feature is noticable in relatively small plants. Any photos of true N.peltata plants showing the tendril insertion available out there?

S

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Si, going by this post http://lhnn.proboards.com/index.cgi?board=s&action=display&thread=3729

it looks to be about a year old it's showing slight signs of peltat, but I guess that also depends on how quickly an idividual plant grows. But, looking at older pic's of peltata the tendril doesn't attached far in.

However, I do know some of the seedlings are thought to be hybrids. I have one, 3inch diam, showing no signs of being peltat and comparing my leaf tip with those in the link, I think mine is a hybrid (as I was told it may be).

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Hi,

I've got two plants of about the same age - one is 12-15cm in diameter and the otherone is 8 cm. The bigger plant showed peltate leafs at a stage of about 10 cm in diameter. The lower part of the leaf and the tendril is extremely hairy. The color of the leaf is deep red. I can post some pictures of my plants this weekend, if you want!?

I hope I could help you...

Cheers

Marc

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Hi Marc,

It would be great to see your photos.

Cheers

S

Hi,

I've got two plants of about the same age - one is 12-15cm in diameter and the otherone is 8 cm. The bigger plant showed peltate leafs at a stage of about 10 cm in diameter. The lower part of the leaf and the tendril is extremely hairy. The color of the leaf is deep red. I can post some pictures of my plants this weekend, if you want!?

I hope I could help you...

Cheers

Marc

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Here they are:

Both plants are from seeds and at the same age

gallery_3714_93_117148.jpg

the bigger one has nice peltate dark red leaves

gallery_3714_93_243869.jpg

the smaller one is just about 6-7cm, but starts already producing peltate leafs

gallery_3714_93_71981.jpg

here an older picture of an emerging leaf, where you can see the hairy lower part of the leaf

gallery_3714_93_96590.jpg

Cheers

Marc

Edited by Marc S.
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Hi Si,

do you remember the seedling I sent you?

I liost mine, but I do remember that when very small the leaf was very truncated and not ovate.

I have subsequently got another seedling that is suspected to be a hybrid, and the leaves are certainly not what I would describe as truncate.

Not a direct help I know but I suspect it may have some merit (sadly)

Matt

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Hello,

I suppose that most N.peltata seedlings that are around originate from me. At least for the plants that I have sold/swapped and for the seedlings Wistuba had I am pretty sure that all of them are the real thing as no other species around had seed, was in flower or had recently flowered. The other species on Mt.Hamiguitan seem to flower seasonally whereas N.peltata flowers obviously all year round.

N.peltata does not have these peltate tendril attachments when young! My plants start to develop that feature and they are >10cm in diameter.

The suspective hybrids are most likely a backcross (peltata x mindanaoensis) x peltata. But from these only a few have been distributed.

Hope these infos help.

Cheers

Thomas.

Edited by Thomas G
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Hello Simon,

My N. peltata was sent to me from Japan before the species was described, being a clone of the same stock that was used to deposit the type specimen from which the species description was made; it did not produce peltate leaf tips in the smallest rosette leaves, but this characteristic rapidly became apparent as the leaves became more robust. Since I spend so much time in the field in Asia, I have handed my Nepenthes collection to Kew and a few trusted friends; Andy S has this plant now, so it might be worth checking with him. Since it's a living example of the type, you really can't go wrong!

Cheers,

Alastair.

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