Can you give dews to much Sun


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I have d.binita and d roseanna and can give them 12 hours of direct sunlight this time of year by moving them from my front deck to my back deck

Is that to much sun?

The problem for these plants would be too much heat rather than too much sun, and that's not likely to be an issue in Oregon.

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It's also a problem if it's too much too fast, as in a radical change from where it was to where it is now, especially if it's from a "Lowes Cube Of Death" or a new arrival.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Mickey

What jimscott says is definitely true.

I was given a pot containing 5 or 6 d. aliciae bought from Bugtraps at Easy Carnivores as a birthday present back in May. They arrived safely enough and after a few days on a north facing kitchen windowsill, sat on a tray of live spahgnum moss, they had perked up and regained all their dew. For reasons unknown I decided it would be a good idea to transfer them straight to the greenhouse which just happened to be during our hottest spell so far this year. That was a big mistake as very soon all the leaves turned red, the dew dried up and the poor little plants looked as though they were going to kick the bucket.

I quickly transferred them back into the house, to a south facing window and within the last few weeks they have grown new leaves, dewed up (is that the right terminology?) and have just had their first feed.

Lesson learned, I should have acclimatised them gradually before such a big changed of environment. Fortunately they recovered quickly and because of that the other good news is I don't have to spend the rest of the summer in the dog house for killing a birthday present from the wife. :whistling:

cheers

gaz

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A drosera I bought recently went straight into the greenhouse (in a semi-shaded spot) and immediately started losing its leaves. Thankfully several new leaves are coming up now so I reckon all it needed was to get accustomed to the new conditions.

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The problem for these plants would be too much heat rather than too much sun, and that's not likely to be an issue in Oregon.

I think this is quite true for a number of Drosera, especially over here in Singapore. Even the near immortal D. capensisis very problematic to grow here unless it gets some kind of cooling. D. binata seems to love heat a lot though: it grows like a weed over here even though temps are always above 30C and can go over 35C easily during the hot season if your area is fairly built up.

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I think this is quite true for a number of Drosera, especially over here in Singapore. Even the near immortal D. capensisis very problematic to grow here unless it gets some kind of cooling.

Indeed. In my hot little top-floor flat in Taipei, D. capensis thrives in the winter, spring and autumn, but goes into decline in the summer. In the past I just grew it as an annual, collecting seed before the plant died in July or August, but this year I've been trying out different approaches with three separate plants. One stays out all day and night, one goes into a cooler box for about five hours every evening (15-20 degrees), and one goes into an A/C room from midnight to 8am (25 degrees). Currently, the first plant is in a horrible state while the other two are hanging in there, looking not too bad.

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Indeed. In my hot little top-floor flat in Taipei, D. capensis thrives in the winter, spring and autumn, but goes into decline in the summer. In the past I just grew it as an annual, collecting seed before the plant died in July or August, but this year I've been trying out different approaches with three separate plants. One stays out all day and night, one goes into a cooler box for about five hours every evening (15-20 degrees), and one goes into an A/C room from midnight to 8am (25 degrees). Currently, the first plant is in a horrible state while the other two are hanging in there, looking not too bad.

Sounds exactly like what happens over here, except that the plants go into decline all year round except for our rainy season at the end of the year. Its so warm here that the A/C room at night doesn't even work well(I can be inside in a T-shirt and shorts and still sweat) during this June-August period. A number of my D. capensis go into a kind of summer dormancy, dying back completely when its hot and re-growing from their roots when things cool down towards year's end. I've been using seed in hopes that I strike it lucky and get a heat resistant seedling...no luck so far.

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I've been using seed in hopes that I strike it lucky and get a heat resistant seedling...no luck so far.

I doubt this will work, as least in the short term...

Most Drosera are highland plants, even when they are found in the lowlands. Only a few species are really adapted to grow well in hot weather; perhaps about 15% of the total species.

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D. schizandra is perhaps the only one that cannot handle direct full sunlight. - Rich

D. adelae and D. prolifera aren't thrilled with direct sun either.

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