D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. glabrata


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Hi all,

about 14 months ago i crossed D. graomogolensis ´Itacambira, Minas Gerais, Brazil´ with several other south american species and now a few of them are mature and i want to show some pictures, in this case D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. glabrata ´Serra do Caraca´ and D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. tomentosa ´Morro do Jambeiro´.

Both crossings were going to flower but for my sadness the flower scape of D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. tomentosa took some kind of damage and it stopped to develop but it was cleary visible that this flower stalk would have been very hairy in comparison to D. graomogolensis.

Both crossings are more rosetted like and they are more looking like very big D. tomentosa var..

The flowers are also slightely different (colour, size and form), additionally the stigmas are much shorter in comparison to D. graomogolensis so the chance that they can self pollinate without any help should be much bigger.

Because of the big difference in size between the stamens and stigmas D. graomogolensis normally does not produce any seed if it´s not pollinated by hand or any insects.

In the moment the plants are not the most beautiful plants, it seems so as if they are resting for any reason.

The flower scapes of D. gaomogolensis do have glandular trichomes but a few of my plants additionally have some normal hairs in the lower part of the scape.

The flower scape of D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. glabrata ´Serra do Caraca´ nearly does not have any normal or glandular hairs in the lower part of the scape, in the upper part of the scape they are glandular.

All in all 15 flowers appeared.

Here you can see some D. graomogolensis pictures:

D. graomogolensis

Here are some pictures of D. tomentosa var. glabrata and D. tomentosa var. tomentosa:

D. tomentosa var.

And here are the pictures of the hybrids.

D. graomogolensis x tomentosa var. glabrata

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the left one is the flower of the hybrid, the right one is a D. graomogolensis flower

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the left one is the flower of D. graomogolensis, the right one is the hybrid flower

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left: D. graomogolensis; middle: the hybrid; right: D. tomentosa var. glabrata

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And here are some pictures of D. graomogolensis var. tomentosa var. tomentosa.

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coloured a little bit up

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and the very hairy flower scape

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I hope you like them. Of course i´ll show again some pictures of the rosettes when they are looking better.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.
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Wow, very nice hybrid...very nice indeed! Congratulations, Daniel.

I sowed pure D. tomentosa var. glabrata ´Serra do Caraca´ few weeks ago and now it's couple of seedlings. Can't wait to see them grown-up. Unfortunately it's a long journey ahead.

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Hi Daniel

I was eagerly waiting to see these photos! Thanx for your hardwork in creating these hybrids.

The GM X Tomentosa var. tomentosa resembles very much the "hairy ascendens" from Cristalia and Grão Mogol locations. The rosettes, leaf blade shape, hairy flower scapes and color are very alike the wild plants. But the flowers are completely different! The flowers of the wild plants are tiny like average D. tomentosa flowers; yours seems to be perfectly intermediate between GM and Tomentosa.

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Many thanks to all of you.

@Miloslav, good luck with your seedlings, D. tomentosa var. glabrata is really a fast and easy grower so you should not have any problems.

@Iggy, yes, of course i´ve pollinated the flowers, but only half of them to see if they will self pollinate without any pollination be hand.

@Aymeric, the program is still going on. The next one is going to be semi adult so i can show again some pictures.

@Adilson, i know you have been waiting for these pictures. Intersting to hear that they are very similar in appearance to the "hairy ascendens" that have been found in the wild.

But could it be that the hybrid i´ve created occurs also in nature, are these two species growing somewhere next to each other?

@Carlos, it´s not very diffilcult to create crossings with D. graomogolensis because of the aspect that D. graomogolensis is normally not selfing by it´s own. But not all crossings are successful, crossings with D. camporupestris or D. graminifolia have not worked till now.

Till now i´ve not been able to collect any seed, soon i´ll report if there is produced any seed or not.

Best regards,

Dani

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Hi Daniel. Great success and report, you really are a master in growing Brazilian species of Drosera. I still have not managed to discover the best conditions for doing so here.

Regards,

Sebastian

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Many thanks, Sebastian. :smile:

I don´t give them any special conditions, most important seems to be a high light level, a high humidity level seems to be not very important after i´m growing them in open trays.

Best regards,

Dani

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here is an update.

From the 16 flowers which appeared i pollinated/selfed only half of them.

Neither the pollinated flowers nor the not pollinated flowers produced any seed.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.
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@Adilson, i know you have been waiting for these pictures. Intersting to hear that they are very similar in appearance to the "hairy ascendens" that have been found in the wild.

But could it be that the hybrid i´ve created occurs also in nature, are these two species growing somewhere next to each other?

Sorry my late reply Daniel

In Grãomogol region we can find D. tomentosa var. tomentosa growing alongside D. graomogolensis and D. grantsauii. Strangely in these ambients we just find the natural hybrid D. X fontinalis and not the one between tomentosa and grão.

I've never found the "hairy ascendens " growing alongside D.grãomogolensis, but I've found it growing near some sparse D. tomentosa var. tomentosa.

The hairy ascendens seems to preffer a very distinct ecological niche from the other species.

The hairy ascendens, different from your hybrid is very fertile, probably a species from hybrid origin.

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Many thanks Jim.

Adilson, many thanks for your comment, really interesting observations.

Perhaps this hybrid has not been found in nature because it´s steril and therefore it can´t create bigger populations in comparison to D. x fontinalis which is fertile.

Perhaps a back crossing with one of the parents could produce again fertile seed.

Best regards,

Dani

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey guys, I'm only seeing this now, haven't been on here much lately. Congrats for yet another cool hybrid Dani!

The GM X Tomentosa var. tomentosa resembles very much the "hairy ascendens" from Cristalia and Grão Mogol locations. The rosettes, leaf blade shape, hairy flower scapes and color are very alike the wild plants. But the flowers are completely different! The flowers of the wild plants are tiny like average D. tomentosa flowers; yours seems to be perfectly intermediate between GM and Tomentosa.

Adilson, I agree, it could be that the "hairy ascendens" is a species of hybrid origin, or it could be that the plants you saw in Grao Mogol are not graomogolensis X tomentosa var. tomentosa, but instead tomentosa var. tomentosa X graomogolensis. Often, hybrid plants resemble most the "mother" species. That would explain the smaller flowers and the fact that they were growing next to tomentosa, and not graomogolensis.

Fernando

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Many thanks Fernando.

In the past i was also wondering if a hybrid between A and B would look like the hybrid between B and A, i thought that they do not have to look equal.

That´s also the reason why i have tried both crossings in most of my tries, A x B and B x A.

If you remember i´ve crossed already D. ascendens with D. tomentosa var. tomentosa but here is again the link:

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=39217&view=findpost&p=286562&hl=ascendens&fromsearch=1

Meanwhile my D. tomentosa var. tomentosa x D. ascendens are nearly adult and i can say that their appereance is nearly the same as the reciprocal crossing but the size is different, till now the plants are much smaller.

I will wait with showing pictures untill they will start to flower to see if the flower size will also be different.

Best regards,

Dani

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