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Wild Mirabilis-Should I save it?

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Hi everybody, I'm bringing up this important matter to all of you.

I was cycling with my dad during this evening along a hillside road when I caught sight of a nep flower inflorescence. Excited, I quickly climbed the hill and discovered that it was a nepenthes mirabilis! :pleasantry: It was quite a nice plant with a stem about 1.5-2 metres long. The plant also appeared to be scrambling along the grassy terrain of the hill with pitchers forming under the shady protection of the grass. There was a basal growing next to it. The flower was a male (I'm guessing as I didn't get a good look!). Unfortunately, I didn't bring my camera along, so I shall be taking pics of the plant tomorrow.

Imagine the joy I was having as this was practically my first encounter of a wild Nepenthes! However my joy was short-lived when my dad told me that the road around this area would be extended and the plant will be removed during the process due to a housing construction that will commence soon. This would mean the plant would have only another year or two before it's demise! :( Thus it has led me to this dilemma: should I save it?

I'm thinking of leaving it to grow naturally until the time arrives when the road is to be extended. What do you think? :oops:

Plus, it's quite a nice looking mirabilis. The peristome was around half a centimetre thick with a reddish ring at the outer side. All opinions will be most appreciated!

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I'd say go with your own opinion. Leave it well alone, until work starts and it is about to be destroyed - then if it is going to be bulldozed, save it.

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You could try taking a few cuttings, get them rooted and established. This way, the genetic stock will be preserved, and could be transplanted somewhere else. Was there any other plants around, especially a female? Good luck. This is why some of these plants are going extinct in the wild. - Rich

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If I were you, there's no doubt about it that I would definitely save that plant so that it may be transplnated somewhere else.....

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You could try taking a few cuttings, get them rooted and established. This way, the genetic stock will be preserved, and could be transplanted somewhere else. Was there any other plants around, especially a female? Good luck. This is why some of these plants are going extinct in the wild. - Rich

I didn't notice other nepenthes along the way. In fact, this mirabilis caught my eye because of it's inflorescence (it's hard not to miss a nep flower stalk sticking out higher than the metre tall grass) and that it was quite close to the road. But I'll be on the lookout, I'm deciding to let the plant grow naturally until the time comes. Don't wanna be too late though that the construction workers fence up the area and forbid me from cycling there! :thumbsdown:

Just wait till the picture come and you'll see why I'm both excited and worried.

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Been raining the whole day, so I couldn't take any pics today :( alright, I'll save it within these two weeks.

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I think you should definetly save it!

There nothing wrong in saving a plant that would die anyway when work starts :moderator: Anyway, keep on the lookout for other Neps :girl_witch:

Good luck!

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You wouldn't be doing anything ethically wrong if you chose to save the plant. If its fate is certain, then I think that morally it would be a nice thing to do. What are the chances of preserving the root system when excavating? Also, would you be inclined to keep it or attempt to replant in another location?

Good luck with your choice mate.

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Pictures are here at last....:smile:

001resized.jpg

The hillside road. It's only one way and there certainly WILL be a road extension in the future.

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The hill where I found the nep. Notice the nepenthes foliage?

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The whole plant

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A few pitchers, I like the reddishness of the lower pitchers.

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Inflorescence. Definitely a male.

@ Brendan-I'll try my best to dig out as much soil and avoid disturbing the root system too much. Most probably I'll be doing cuttings on this plant since it's already scrambling along the ground. As for the mother plant, I'll keep it first. Not sure what other location near my area is suitable for the plant. Maybe the hill behind my house :pleasantry:

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Thanks for posting pictures!

I say save itm and move it to your house side hill :pleasantry:

Cheers

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Very cool pictures you took there Edward :Laie_98: and wow, what a nice Nepenthes it is :Laie_97: I'm glad you're saving it, cause I would've done the same....It's sad that these wild habitats are shrinking at an alarming rate...Thanks for sharing Nice pictures..

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I doubt you even need my opinion, but save it!

If I were you, having seen that, I'd spend all day looking for neps in the nearby area. You have the priviledge of not needing an expensive plane journey to see them in the wild!

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As pretty much universal above, save it.

Alex.

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