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Robert

veitchii beauties

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the hairy veitchii, a humble beginning...

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it comes in diverse forms and colours.

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some growers i met mentioned that veitchii from the kelabit highland "climb" on trees but trees being sparse hence it was rare to observe? perhaps the statement was untrue. In-situ observation showed most scramble on the ground. where trees are available they climbed but their tendrils are not in uniform arrangement, as in the case of sabah's maliau basin tree clasping form. Any comment and why?

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Oh what a hairy plants in the first picture :wink: and that coulours. I like it very much :wink: for sharing

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This is an interesting species in that it has nonprehensil tendrils (they do not wrap around anything and clasp onto small twigs), and that the leaf rotation on mature plants is just about 180 degrees, so that they open up directly apart from each other. The leaves tend to curl backwards as if to embrace a host trunk, in which case, if a suitable diameter trunk gets into the act, the leaves force their pitchers to almost wrap around and open on the other side of the trunk, sometimes catching a small limb for additional support. Otherwise, they seem perfectly happy to scramble around in the detritus, leaf litter and moss on the forest floor. Both highland and lowland forms of N. veitchii do this, although they have different leaf shapes, the lowland form being longer and more spathulate. - Rich

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Beautiful pitchers!!! One of my favorite Nepenthes and photos in the wild....Breathtaking! Just got a couple of the Veithcii 'Pink' last week :wink:

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Lovely plants and photos! This really is one of the more striking species in my opinion.

I didn't realize they get quite that hairy. Is this a variety, or do they get like that as they grow older?

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Thanks everyone for the nice comment, and also Rich for the explanation.

nadja, these squat varieties from kelabit highland are always hairy, and very much diverse as shown in the post.

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Robert,

What a stunning array of N. vietchii pitchers, just beautiful. That unopened pitcher almost looks like some hairy animal.

If the plants leaf arrangement (as you write) stays the same, whether the plants grow in the open, or next to a tree, then I guess the phenomenon is not ecophene. Also, in Clarke's book there is a photo of a plant of the climbing form lying on the ground, and the pitchers are still arranged the same way, only that the pitchers are carrying the plant. Since you mention the locations in Kelabit and Maliau, one would think that it might be because isolation, since there is some distance between those two areas. However, since the climbing form also can be found in Batu Lawi, which is within the Kelabit Highland, that doesn't fit either.

Maybe the simple answer is that it some sort of local isolation, based on their habitat. Plants growing in more shaded/forested areas climb to get more light, and this growth pattern has been imprinted from the ancestral plants, so now they grow this way, whether, or not there are trees nearby, and the same goes with the decumbent plants in the open areas.

Regards,

Christer

Edited by christerb

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Veitchiis are definately a favourite of ours and we are expanding our collection, great to see the different vareties and photos :shock:

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Thanks for the explanation, christerb. A greater part of the kelabit highlands were still inaccessible and unexplored and somewhere perhaps lie some magnificient examples of the tree climbing veitchii, besides Batu Lawi and Batu Buli.

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Hi Robert,

It's just a theory on my part. Interesting to hear that there are areas in the Kelabit Highlands that are not explored. Seems that is would be an interesting goal for expeditions.

Regards,

Christer

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