Is it a P. ehlersiae?


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Thanks everyone.

To me, it is difficult to distinguish between P. esseriana, P. jaumavensis and P. ehlersiae. Do you have any trick to distinguish between them except the flower? Or looking at flower is the only way to distinguish them?

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Actually, I was going to say P. 1713 or P. 1717. Here's a P. 1717, FWIW:

Picture005-10.jpgP. 1717

100_9401.jpg

Picture075.jpgP. jaumviensis

Picture045.jpgP. ehleresiae

Picture023.jpgP. esseriana

Picture006-9.jpgP. 1713

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With nearly optimal growing conditions the foliage of these closely related species is somewhat distinctive, though just barely. In less than optimal conditions the vegetative parts become less well defined, hence, less distinctive. Some growers question if perhaps; Pinguicula esseriana, Pinguicula jaumavensis, Pinguicula ehlersiae, and Pinguicula debbertiana, may simply be slightly different forms of the very same species.

Edited by Joseph Clemens
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With nearly optimal growing conditions the foliage of these closely related species is somewhat distinctive, though just barely. In less than optimal conditions the vegetative parts become less well defined, hence, less distinctive. Some growers question if perhaps; Pinguicula esseriana, Pinguicula jaumavensis, Pinguicula ehlersiae, and Pinguicula debbertiana, may simply be slightly different forms of the very same species.

In my growing experience the foliage of P. esseriana can be surprisingly variable, within the very same clone und quite similar growing conditions i can get different looking plants.

I dont think P. debbertiana fits into this "same species" theory, as it clearly is distinctive. And P. ehlersiae should probably also be considered a good species, at least some newer Chromosome counts lean toward this solution. However, i believe P. jaumavensis and P. esseriana to be conspecific, especially when you take into account, that G. Köhres (in the scientific description of P. esseriana mentioned as the first collector of P. esseriana) found the plants on a mountain near Jaumave.

But clearly, there is more research needed in this area.

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