Some news from Bokor hill


Sockhom
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What is the point of nominating such an area as a National Park? It seems to get treated in much the same way as any other unprotected area would be.

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Well it seems Cambodja really has embrassed the capatalistic system now! The only thing counts is making a LOT of money! A bloody shame and scandal.

And why did the invent such a think like CITES at all?

Alexander

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Hi,

this is a real shame. Maybe the Bokor developers took Gunung Ulu Kali / Genting Highlands in Malaysia as an example. The mountain top once beautiful mossy forest laden with Neps and all other delicacies has been turned into a clump of concrete, Theme Parks, Hotels, McDonalds etc. It is totally surreal! Have a look:

http://www.rwgenting.com/

http://www.genting.com/history/index.htm

I wonder why anybody actually wants to go to such a place. Why not expereince some pristine nature instead of this artificial monstrosity?

Big part of that development is failed, rotting and collapsing construction sites are just around the corner where people cant see it. Waste of environment and ressources, I say. Give the running bit another 20 years and business may be down, but the mountain is spoiled for much much longer...

Neps can be seen nicely though, and it has no endemics. Lets hope that N.bokor can cope with development as well.

regards, Mathias

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Hi,

this is a real shame. Maybe the Bokor developers took Gunung Ulu Kali / Genting Highlands in Malaysia as an example. The mountain top once beautiful mossy forest laden with Neps and all other delicacies has been turned into a clump of concrete, Theme Parks, Hotels, McDonalds etc. It is totally surreal! Have a look:

http://www.rwgenting.com/

http://www.genting.com/history/index.htm

I wonder why anybody actually wants to go to such a place. Why not expereince some pristine nature instead of this artificial monstrosity?

Big part of that development is failed, rotting and collapsing construction sites are just around the corner where people cant see it. Waste of environment and ressources, I say. Give the running bit another 20 years and business may be down, but the mountain is spoiled for much much longer...

Neps can be seen nicely though, and it has no endemics. Lets hope that N.bokor can cope with development as well.

regards, Mathias

And in those same countries they hang you probably for a single Nepenthes seed saved from a buildingsite...

Why cant they build that sh** somewhere else, enough places where it does not do that much harm!

I hope the capatilistic system will be history soon!

Alexander

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Hello

Let's find something positive in this case ;)

Due to Sockhom's generousity [he was spreading seeds and seedlings of N.bokorensis everywhere] there are dozens of them in cultivation. Many of them are blooming already, and according to quite big genetic biodiversity of plants, mayby some day we will be possible to reintroduce this specie into it's natural world....

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Hello,

Good ol' Fernando Rivadavia was kind enough to send me this link:

http://julianoandermann.blogspot.com/2011/...arnivora-e.html

This is a short video that shows what's going on Mount Bokor.

For those, like me, who can't understand Portuguese, check the following page. You'll be able to read the text in English:

http://www.aptnvideo.net/pages/browse/play...jsp?item=174811

Thank you for the link, Fernando!

All the best,

François.

Edited by Sockhom
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Just read this post. What horrible news.

From what I understand, the Ministry of Environment has always been a weak one, with powerful business interests doing what they wanted inside "protected areas", with the backing of more powerful ministries. There was uncontrolled logging inside a lot of parks up to around 2002, and as I recall that only stopped when the big international donors threatened to withhold funds unless the illegal logging ceased. Now, I'm not sure if the big donors would have as much influence as there's more private investment money floating around. Even when it isn't a huge high-profile commercial development like what's happening on Phnom Bokor, there's still low-level land clearing by military or business figures for oil-palm or pineapple plantations, for example, not to mention low-level clearing and farming by ordinary folk trying to make a living.

Alexander, this is a country that did very, very badly under communism in the '70s, and I don't think that taking away a profit-driven economy would miraculously solve the country's troubles. The problem with Cambodia isn't so much that it follows a capitalist system as that it follows a gangster system, with the ruling party and its allies sitting at the top of the ladder doing whatever they want. The reasons for their lawlessness are more complex than just political ideology, as all the governments that Cambodia has had throughout its recent history have plundered the country one way or another.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello,

I am sad to announce that all the bokorensis plants that you have seen in all the pictures I posted these last years are now gone. This is a quote from a mail I received today from my fellow friend Jeremy Holden who works on Cambodian carnivorous plants with me:

Basically the plant in its known areas is now highly threatened. The roadside plants are all gone because this section has been expanded. Further roads are penetrating in to the interior also, including the waterfall area. Where we filmed the plants is very flat and wide and I wouldn't be surprised if this is not the site for the proposed golf course.

There is a last chance that I can include some original spots of N. bokorensis in a kind of botanical park that might be built up there on Mount Bokor. I will meet the guys in charge next August and will use my best diplomatic skills. But I'm not optimistic.

François.

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Hello Francois,

This truly is gut-wrenching news, although I do appreciate you keeping us informed.

Also, I'm very pleased that this fantastic species is in cultivation and will be propagated through the Ark of Life project. Without your generosity, this plant truly would not have had any hope of possible reintroduction someday. Thanks for rescuing this one for us Socky, it is deeply appreciated. You're definitely a botanical hero of sorts... :wink:

Happy Growing,

Brian Barnes

ICPS Director of Conservation

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Hi,

I've been quite filled with sadness when I learned that almost all known populations of Nepenthes bokorensis have been wiped out from Phnom Bokor. Yesterday, my friend Jelle Wouters, from Belgium, kindly send me a mail to inform me that he managed to pollinate his female N. bokorensis thanks to the pollen of three different males. As far as I know, these will be the first seeds of N. bokorensis produced in cultivation. A spark in the darkness.

Well done Jelle!

pollinatednepenthesboko.jpg

François.

Edited by Sockhom
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