"Hairy" Nepenthes...


dchasselblad74
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've recently aquired an awesome Nepenthes Chaniana x Veitchii from a forum member(Thanks so much, you know who you are), and I noticed how "Hairy" this plant is...I wonder, is that an adaptation to protect itself from cold or dryness? Anyone have a clue to this?

DexFC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought the "fur" in the one I mentioned, was from the Chaniana parentage...?

DexFC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Dex,

I think the hairs help the new leaves unfurl. Seems most species without hair have leaves without petioles, whereas those with hair also have petioles. I think the hairs allow the new leaf to grow and expand without becoming stuck in the petiole of the previous leaf.

Edited by Dave Evans
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Dex,

I think the hairs help the new leaves unfurl. Seems most species without hair have leaves without petioles, whereas those with hair also have petioles. I think the hairs allow the new leaf to grow and expand without becoming stuck in the petiole of the previous leaf.

I see what you're saying Dave, but how come other Nepenthes don't have hair or at least not as much?

There is a cactus that lives in South America somewhere and this cactus has white long hair like the actor Christopher Lloyd and the reason for the hair is to actually capture mist in the air and channels it towards its roots, in turn watering itself.

I wonder if those Neps that are particularly super hairy have a special purpose, like that cactus I mentioned....?

DexFC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

perhaps to prevent predation on developing pitchers?

Interesting hypothesis, because the new young leaves coming out of the Nep Chaniana x Veitchii looks exactly like a Tarantula leg...

DexFC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The hairs would keep humidity higher around the leaf, and also noticed on mine they help to stop water touching the leaf surface, no idea if that's why they're there though.

It makes sense, cause the plant needs humid conditions to form leaves and pitchers properly...Cause in the wild, these tropical plants experience two seasons, wet and dry....

DexFC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share