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Banana

Pinguicula bohemica in habitat

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I visited the interesting site with P. bohemica about 50 km away from Prague (Czech Republic) last weekend. This astonishing place is one of last natural sites with population of P.bohemica. The plants currently blooming. They grow in clay on the edge of amelioration system. I hope that P.bohemica will survive because this natural site is not protected in law.

anfVJ.jpg anipS.jpg ankV0.jpg annp9.jpg anpUi.jpgansor.jpg anuTA.jpg anxnJ.jpg anzSS.jpg anCn0.jpg anES9.jpg anHmi.jpg anJRr.jpg anMlA.jpg

Edited by Banana

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These pictures are fantastic! Thank you very much for sharing. I always enjoy pictures of plants in their natural environment.

Its really quite a critical situation out there, but as far as i know, plants have been grown and propagated by Dr. Studnicka, at least something. I really hope the situation will get better in near future.

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Well, the best locality with the biggest population is managed by volunteers (mostly from Darwiniana growers company) and it looks very well, number of the plants is increasing (Pinguicula like open substrates for germination and some management were made for this). It seems, that this population is quite stable and able to survive, but the other localities are not in such good state...

Edited by Zlatokrt

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Different coloured flowers.

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Well, the best locality with the biggest population is managed by volunteers (mostly from Darwiniana growers company) and it looks very well, number of the plants is increasing (Pinguicula like open substrates for germination and some management were made for this). It seems, that this population is quite stable and able to survive, but the other localities are not in such good state...

Is there any scientific evidence how the numer of plants was increased after "baby management" of Darwiniana members for last 2-3 seasons? I would like to see any reliable evidence.

This "management" is also controversial for many of the reasons. :on_the_quiet:

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Is there any scientific evidence how the numer of plants was increased after "baby management" of Darwiniana members for last 2-3 seasons? I would like to see any reliable evidence.

This "management" is also controversial for many of the reasons. :pleasantry:

For which reasons, Kamil? I agree with Adam. This site looks very well and volunteers do a good job on it. P. bohemica and other rare plants are growing better now.

There are some photos from P. bohemica site which I made this weekend. You can see a lot of seedlings, adult plants with ovarys... http://jakubstepan.galerie.cz/4686837-akce-leto-2010

Photos from other time (the same site)... http://jakubstepan.galerie.cz/3666337-kosiste

And there are photos from another site of P. bohemica, I live near this site :) http://jakubstepan.galerie.cz/3666309-bohemka-v-polabi

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Here in the Netherlands former populations of Pinguicula vulgaris have been restored by removing the upper layer of topsoil until the clean mineral soil is reached. On those moist to wet, poor in nutriants soils, you get a lot of rare and lost plants back like Pinguicula. Usely those plants are a kind of pionering plants. If you do not remove now and then parts of the vegetation when it becames to dens you will lose those plants. In the past the existence of those plants where often de result of agricultural practises of paisents. They took turfs of heather for there stables and the mix of turf with animal dung was used as fertileser. And for this turfs they needed wilder lands with heather and things like that. In some parts of the world like in mountainous areas you get natural erotion wich also creats those bare patches of soil wich can be colonised by plants like Pinguicula. And I have noticed that with Nepenthes rajah the same happens,. Seedlings you find on erod patches of bare soil.

Alexander

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