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Petiolaris Terraria


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Hello,

here are some pictures of my Petiolaris setup. I have two tanks with a size of

100x60x50 and 130x60x60cm. As lights I use 4x54W for the large terrarium and

4x 39W for the smaller one. On the ground I placed patterns (which normally were

used to cover fluorescent bulbs) covered with fibrous web so that the plants are not

permently in water tray. For a good air circulation I placed two fans in each tank. As

exterior facing I used an insulation which is covered with aluminium. Due to the

lights the day temperatures are around 35-37 degrees and fall to 23 degrees in the

night. The humidity ranges between 50 to70%.

I cultivate my plants in a mix of peat, perlite and two sizes of quartz sand. I covered

the suface also with quartz sand (1-3mm) to avoid slime. I fertilize my plants every

2-3 weeks with leaf fertilizer.

First some photos of the smaller terrarium in which I cultivate my large plants...

Terrarium.jpg

Terrarium1.jpg

Terrarium2.jpg

Terrarium3.jpg

Terrarium4.jpg

Terrarium5.jpg

Terrarium6.jpg

Terrarium7.jpg

Terrarium8.jpg

Terrarium9.jpg

Terrarium10.jpg

Here is a photo of the large terrarium in which I cultivate my seedlings...

Terrarium11.jpg

Best regards,

Matthias

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very nice :cheers:

have you a heater for winter nights,i have trouble whit this in winter ,i not heat my housse in winter at night more then 20°,only 15° and this is to cold for them i supoose?

You hold this also not very wet ,howlong can she stay whitout water?

Cheers Willy :shock:

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Hi Matthias,

That is hands down the best petiolatis set up that I've seen! I therefore have a few questions:

1) Is the tank lid partially open so that air from outside the tank can enter and circulate?

2) What type of fans do you use? Presumably, they need to be fans that can safely withstand damp conditions.

3) When you say that the plants are not permanently in the water tray, do you mean that the pots are sitting in water for some of the time?

4) Do your plants go dormant? If so do you alter your conditions in any way when dormancy occurs?

5) What photoperiod do you use?

Apologies for all of the questions, but I would like to emulate your conditions as far as possible!

Cheers,

Greg

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Hi Greg, hi Willy,

I ordered the terraria without upper glass plate. I fixed the fluorescent bulbs on a coated wooden board.

The control gears are outside the tanks to avoid too high temperatures. Between the wooden board are

distance pieces (3-4mm) to provide a good air circulation. I use LUCKY REPTIL TERRA FANS which runs

day round for more than 2 years now without any problems.

Here two photos...

Luefter.jpg

Luefter1.jpg

The pattern keep some space between the terrarium ground and the fibrous web. I water only so much

to fill the space. So the fibrous web is permanently damp but the plants do not stay in water tray.

Some species go in dormancy (D. ordensis, D. brevicornis, D. spec. Mandorah and D. derbyensis and

D. falconeri). When D. falconeri or D. spec. Mandorah go into dormancy I place them on another pattern

to provide not too wet conditions. Apart of that I don't change the conditions.

I don't use a heater in the winter as the terraria are placed in the boiler room. The temperatures decrease

a bit in winter (day: 30 degrees, night: 18-20 degrees).

The photoperiod is about 14 hours.

Best regards,

Matthias

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It used to be that when my Petios went into dormancy that was equated with death. Now, it seems, it just means looking like "death warmed over" for several months. Then they come out of it on their own.

What does D. falconeri look like dormant? I think I have one that is.

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Thank you for your kind words!

It used to be that when my Petios went into dormancy that was equated with death. Now, it seems, it just means looking like "death warmed over" for several months. Then they come out of it on their own.

What does D. falconeri look like dormant? I think I have one that is.

The leaves of D. falconeri die completly back when it goes into dormancy as the plants outlive the dry period in a bulb.

I keep my plants only slightly damp in this time. After several month they start to produce new leaves.

Best regards,

Matthias

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Sorry, but all my plants have already finished dormancy and produce leaves. So I can't show you a plant which is completly in dormancy.

Here is a photo of D. falconeri 'Wangi' which I took last weekend. I hope it helps...

D_falconeri_Wangi1.jpg

Best regards

Matthias

Edited by Matthias
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Matthias whit your systeem ,how many times must you watering,everyday?I think whit this warmt and 2 fans ,the water must be very quickly damp off and dry out?or not?

Cheers Willy

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Matthias whit your systeem ,how many times must you watering,everyday?I think whit this warmt and 2 fans ,the water must be very quickly damp off and dry out?or not?

Cheers Willy

Hi Willy,

due to the high evaporation rate in consequence of high temperatures and runnings fans I have to water my plants every other day.

Best regards,

Matthias

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This was how the plant looked in January:

Picture001-7.jpg

This is how it looks now, after trimming the dead leaves:

Picture001-22.jpg

This is a baby plant from that plant:

Picture005-9.jpg

That baby plant looks like this now:

Picture002-19.jpg

Is my sickly looking plant dormant or just sickly looking?

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I was wondering - how long a dry/hot dormancy do petiolaris sundews need? There are 3 very hot and dry months here in San Diego where I could give them dormancy, so I was wondering if 3 months is enough or if they need more or less time than that.

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I am not 100 percent sure whether your plant goes into dormancy or not. The leaves of my plants are completly

dry. I would keep the plant not too wet (but not dry) and watch how the plant react to this.

Normally the beginning of dormancy of my plants is November/December as the temperatures fall a bit in this time.

The first leaf flush I can notice in April/May . But there are also some exception which goes in dormancy without cause whenever

they want to.

Best regards,

Matthias

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This D. lanata was dormant and after several months it woke up and is now flowering:

Picture003-18.jpg

At one point it looked like this current D. lanata:

Picture005-17.jpg

They can really remain horrible looking for a long time!

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I was wondering - how long a dry/hot dormancy do petiolaris sundews need? There are 3 very hot and dry months here in San Diego where I could give them dormancy, so I was wondering if 3 months is enough or if they need more or less time than that.

It is during the hot and dry months that the plants will grow the best in cultivation. The plants will generally go dormant when the temps drop in winter and reawaken when the temps increase.

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