Landscaping with Darlingtonia


BobZ
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Below is an example of the use of Darlingtonia as a landscape plant in an urban setting. The United Indian Health Services building in Arcata, California, USA has created a completely artifical stream that runs through a central plaza, under the building, and around its perimeter. The water is then pumped back to the beginning of the stream. Clumps of Darlingtonia and other riparian plants are interspersed throughout the 'stream' system, making a lovely setting.

UIHS_Darlingtonia318.JPG

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Some of the plants are planted so that part of the leaves are submerged, others have the water level about 2 inches below the crown. All are planted in a gravelly sand (not in pots) and appear to be healthy and well established. One of these days I will hunt down the gardener and get details.

BTW, in many of the natural sites in the wild, Darlingtonia can be found growing directly in small streams of running water with their rhizomes established in loose rock-gravel-sand substrate.

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Bob,

What a nice cluster of Darlingtonia. Sure look very healthy. I would love to see a picture of these guys every year to follow how they do.

I have seen wild Darlingtonia thriving in running streamlets of water where you can hear the ripple very easily. I have seen wild Darlingtonia thriving at the side (but in the current) of rapidly flowing streams which you could not walk across due to the dangerous rapid flow of the water.

I have also seen very rarely wild Darlingtonia growing in stagnant water (must have been microscopic movement somewhere).

Thanks for the beautiful pic Bob.

Brad

Ventura California

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I was wondering if it would be possible to use one of those "fancy" water features with cascading pools to grow Darlingtonia? Each 'pool' filled with planting media and the water flow adjusted to a constant trickle, would that simulate their natural environment?

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that plant looks so big and healthy. I have some from seed cobras growing in 5 inch shallow plastic pots standing in 2" rain water in north west england, they are growing very well with both sphagnum (they are in pure sphagnum) and cobra rhizomes growing over the pot edges, i am convinced these plants like very shallow moss substrate as it allows lots of water movement through past the roots, i may try some experiments when i'm back inthe UK with a moss 'mat' about 3" deep in a large 3"x2'x2' plastic tray, i'll put some of the young plants (actually flowering at 6-7" high) in and flood with cold water each day, they will have lots of room for stolon growth with out the cramped stagnant conditions that a pot can create. austin.

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Can any of our members tell me the types of plants growing alongside Darlingtonia in the natural environment. I have an idea for the cascade system using 3inch deep trays and a small pump but would like to plant up the trays with other natives.

Thanx guys and gals I know you can help

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  • 18 years later...

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Edited by marymacleo
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