New to Pinguicula


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A few weeks back I received my first few pings from a nursery in Europe. I put them in with my lowland Nepenthes for now to let them settle in. Since it is winter here now should I let the plants go dormant or would it be alright to keep them going until next winter?

The plants are still quite small and I don't want to do the wrong thing. Would it harm them if they were artificially put through two summer seasons before being allowed to go dormant?

Thanks!

Nadja

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Thanks Jim!

So it's obviously not a good idea to keep them growing...

Can I just leave them outside? It does get pretty cold here in July probably around 2° celsius at night.

If they don't need artificial light during their dormancy I could also leave them on a windowsill inside the house would that work?

Sorry I am sure all this was asked before, just another total newbie to pings!

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They are all mexican pinguicula. These are the species I have:

P.agnata x Pinguicula gracilis

P.gracilis x Pinguicula 'Sethos'

P.laueana

P.spec. Import Mexico

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My own experience dictates that cultivating them outside is about as successful as the driving record of Toonces the Cat". It starts off okay and then goes downhill... or over a hill after that.

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My own experience dictates that cultivating them outside is about as successful as the driving record of Toonces the Cat". It starts off okay and then goes downhill... or over a hill after that.

LOL ok, I'll only sacrifice one or two plants to experiment then. Do you have an idea on why this does not work so well for you?

Just curious as my conditions would be a bit different to yours.

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My own experience dictates that cultivating them outside is about as successful as the driving record of Toonces the Cat". It starts off okay and then goes downhill... or over a hill after that.

What about in a cold frame? Might protect the plants from frost damage (assuming temperature only barely drops below 0c) and rotting due to too wet conditions (humidity might be an issue though).

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I don't have a cold frame.... but I do have a working relationship with a wholesale greenhouse / nursery, that can help me out with fridge temp dormancy plants.

It was hard to control the conditions. One summer I came home to find that a rainstorm uprooted the collection, scattering them about and leading to rot. Another summer they got too dry. But that was my experience... or rather inexperience. On a grow rack, inside, I see them more frequently and conditions are far more stable.

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  • 5 months later...

My favorite way to grow this group of Pinguicula:

Indoors, under lots of fluorescent lights, close to the plants. With this kind of lighting, 365 days of the year with 24 hour photoperiods seem optimal. In all-mineral media. Fed with frequent, small quantities of dried insect powder, dusted on the leaves. In individual or group pots. Floating in trays of water 365 days of the year. Some will only flower if they get very chilly nightime temperatures. Some flower almost non-stop in warm or cool temperatures. Some are heterophyllous, with different leaves in Summer vs Winter. Some produce almost the same leaves, year-'round.

I've had excellent results with the above methods. Here is a photo of plants grown this way -->

Christmas_group_photo_a_web.jpg

I like to give them more of the good things than they can get in nature. More P.A.R., more water, more nutrients, etc. All you need to do is be sure to balance all of the environmental factors, together.

Edited by Joseph Clemens
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Mine were all growing on a grow rack, by a south-facing door / window and are nowat window sills where th temps dip into the 50's. I'm hoping that the seasonal changes that I am trying to induce will trigger the plants to flower, when the photoperiod and temps rise again.

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Every plant in that right-hand row, front to back, are labeled as Pinguicula 'Tina', because when I originally obtained the cultivar, it was misidentified as that cultivar. Subsequently I discovered the mistake - these plants are actually, Pinguicula 'Gina' -->

P_Gina_2006.jpg

Pinguicula 'Tina', came into bloom a little later, and actually looks like this -->

P_Tina_2006.jpg

I've found that a major environmental trigger for blooming, isn't photoperiod, nor moisture level, but by just providing very cool evenings.

Edited by Joseph Clemens
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