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Problems whit Drosera


ObiplantsKenobi

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a few weeks since my sundews are somewhat rare, are being black, nose if over watering, or excessive sun, the shade and had started to put so, they began to rest and continue irrigation Like, I have no place in the sun and now I'm going to leave an area that gives the sun, and see what happens, any idea friends? thanks

Pic 1

carnisyparquedelascienc.th.jpg

Pic 2

carnisyparquedelascienc.th.jpg

Best Regards Ignacio D

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Hi Ignacio,are this the plants from Dusan?She looks very bad :sad: ,what ground do you use ? overwatering ,for sure not.Maeby to little sun or liht? rainwater?

My plants from Dusan looks very different ,

Cheers Willy

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yes, this dusan plants ,peat moss 70% 30%perlite, I was watering with tap water ,but it is not something new, in fact all my carnivorous sundews and are watered well for years and are perfect nose that can be the problem, apart and water them with distilled water to see if it changes for the better?

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Hi, Ignacio!

I see you are having some troubles with these sundews. They look really bad. From what I see in the pictures, I think your plants are dying of 2 main reasons:

1. Maybe you put them into direct sun after repotting upon arrival.....that is not standard procedure. Plants after repotting should be avoided full sun until they root up successfully to a new substrate. I grow these species in the full sun outside, so later you can do the same.

2. I see salts deposits on the surface of the substrate, maybe you should switch to distilled/rainwater. You write that you have been using tap water for your other plants with success. I must add that some species are more sensitive to salt content in the substrate than others (especially when they are not adjusted to such). All my plants get pure distilled, rain or reverse osmosis water.

I do not think that pot depth matters much in this case. Certainly not with d.sp.'Pretty Rosette', which has quite short roots for a sundew. D. admirabilis, on the other hand, has extremely long roots, but she can get her way around if the pot is wide enough.

To sum it up, my advice is you keep the plants away from direct sun (artificial light or semi-shade), give them higher humidity and pure water. For substrate, I use peat/sand mixtures. These sundews grow in the wild in peat-sandy substrate, some gravel as well. I dont think LFS/perlite is a good substrate since it can hold extreme amounts of water. Then the roots tend to rot.

I hope your plants will get better soon. If not, write me an email and I will send you new ones just for shipping cost. No problem. I would like you to enjoy them, they are beautiful dews:-) Sometimes it takes more than one try to master growing of these species;-) You wouldnt believe how many dews I have killed when I was young! :ohmy:

Edited by dudo klasovity
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Thank you very much for the advice, I will follow them all, if in a few weeks aver improve, upload photos within 15 days to see if it improves their appearance and make them indirect light and shadow with distilled water

Hi, Ignacio!

I see you are having some troubles with these sundews. They look really bad. From what I see in the pictures, I think your plants are dying of 2 main reasons:

1. Maybe you put them into direct sun after repotting upon arrival.....that is not standard procedure. Plants after repotting should be avoided full sun until they root up successfully to a new substrate. I grow these species in the full sun outside, so later you can do the same.

2. I see salts deposits on the surface of the substrate, maybe you should switch to distilled/rainwater. You write that you have been using tap water for your other plants with success. I must add that some species are more sensitive to salt content in the substrate than others (especially when they are not adjusted to such). All my plants get pure distilled, rain or reverse osmosis water.

I do not think that pot depth matters much in this case. Certainly not with d.sp.'Pretty Rosette', which has quite short roots for a sundew. D. admirabilis, on the other hand, has extremely long roots, but she can get her way around if the pot is wide enough.

To sum it up, my advice is you keep the plants away from direct sun (artificial light or semi-shade), give them higher humidity and pure water. For substrate, I use peat/sand mixtures. These sundews grow in the wild in peat-sandy substrate, some gravel as well. I dont think LFS/perlite is a good substrate since it can hold extreme amounts of water. Then the roots tend to rot.

I hope your plants will get better soon. If not, write me an email and I will send you new ones just for shipping cost. No problem. I would like you to enjoy them, they are beautiful dews:-) Sometimes it takes more than one try to master growing of these species;-) You wouldnt believe how many dews I have killed when I was young! :rolleyes:

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Anywhere from 30% to 70% silica sand is fine. The rest is peat. Using a drainage (layer of coarse silica gravel/pebbles on the bottom of the pot) helps too.

Make sure you give them enough light, just avoid direct sunlight for about 2-3 weeks;-)

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