Capensis with "carnivorous" flowers!!!!


Guest Vagabonda
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Guest Vagabonda

Hi All !!

my d. capensis (typical form) and d. capensis albino form are producing flowers in these days.

The strange fact is that both plants have developed carnivorous tentacles on the sepals.

Can somebody tell me what's happening?

It's the second year that it happens; it's amazing because ALL the plants have this strange flowers. I don't know if it's "normal". I have this plants from 4 years, the albino comes from Belgium, the typical from Italy.

I'm waiting for your suggestions!! Thank you!

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Hi All !!

my d. capensis (typical form) and d. capensis albino form are producing flowers in these days.

The strange fact is that both plants have developed carnivorous tentacles on the sepals.

Can somebody tell me what's happening?

It's the second year that it happens; it's amazing because ALL the plants have this strange flowers. I don't know if it's "normal". I have this plants from 4 years, the albino comes from Belgium, the typical from Italy.

I'm waiting for your suggestions!! Thank you!

sepalo.jpg

sepalo1.jpg

sepalo2.jpg

sepalo3.jpg

sepalo4.jpg

sepalo5.jpg

An interesting mutation! And you say it's stable?

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This is certainly interesting! I'm guessing your growing conditions must be producing just the right conditions that switch up protein functions or transcription. I don't think it would be stable if grown in someone's conditions that have normal Capensis flowers, but the only way for you to test is to swap plants with a person who has a "normal" flowering Capensis. It's just odd that both the typical and 'Albino' would have a mutation, if it did, indeed have one.

Very cool! Definitely try experimenting with growing it in other locations, and be sure to give us a report.

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This is certainly interesting! I'm guessing your growing conditions must be producing just the right conditions that switch up protein functions or transcription. I don't think it would be stable if grown in someone's conditions that have normal Capensis flowers, but the only way for you to test is to swap plants with a person who has a "normal" flowering Capensis. It's just odd that both the typical and 'Albino' would have a mutation, if it did, indeed have one.

Very cool! Definitely try experimenting with growing it in other locations, and be sure to give us a report.

Could this mutation be triggered by fast temperatures variations? She lives in the north-est of Italy (more or less like me) and we got a very variable weather with some very cold winter months, a first part of the spring quite warm and then cool temps and rain.

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It's called false vivipary. Here's some information: http://www.sarracenia.com/faq/faq3700.html

Yes...we know about false vivipary but this case is particular because we have it on all the flowers on that stalk and on two plants at the same time. So, in my opinion, there should be some environment issues that triggered this behavior.

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Guest Vagabonda

thanks everybody! I hope I can give you all information you need:

I saw for the first time this strange flower last year; my plants have a lot of trip (Belgium, Italy -Rome, close Naple, Padua, now Udine and soon Bolzano close Germany). But they are very strong, "eat" lot of insect, have a lot of glue, they grow fast and make lot of flowers. They don't look stressed. Sarracenia, Dionea and other plants are really stressed, they don't have any flower or new pitcher... Capensis are the strongest plants I have! During the winner grow in the greenhouse (outside, with no artificial light), they don't loose the leaves, and stille have glue. In spring time I put theme outside, in the garden. I don't do anything else. This spring is cold and there is no sun, but last year it was better but the flowers were "carnivorous" as well.

I don't know what to think about this.... the water I use is the rain, or osmosis. Any fertilizer, any insecticide. Nothing. They live outside all year long.

Sorry for my english!

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Guest Vagabonda
but the only way for you to test is to swap plants with a person who has a "normal" flowering Capensis. It's just odd that both the typical and 'Albino' would have a mutation, if it did, indeed have one.

Very cool! Definitely try experimenting with growing it in other locations, and be sure to give us a report.

Do you mean I give one of my capensis to somebody else and keep another one "normal"?

In July I move, I change everything, house, region and anymore garden..... maybe I must wait next year and see what happen!

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