Double trap


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I wonder ,has anyone ever had success with those one-off (strange)leaf cuttings?

leaf cutting of this leaf give typical vft for sure.

last years i put one spray (pyrèthre) on plants and i had some very strange trap like that.

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leaf cutting of this leaf give typical vft for sure.

last years i put one spray (pyrèthre) on plants and i had some very strange trap like that.

That's a scary thought!

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it is spray, try on one typical vft that haven't got aphids and you'll see lot of very strange trap.

lot of chimical spray cause this on plants

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What a pity, it is only one trap. All others are normal.

IMG_3945_resize.JPG

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I can't compete with your double trap, but I think it is worth attempting to breed such things! This is a thumbnail photograph of a Dionaea 'Bigmouth' that I originally got a start of from Bob Ziemer.

The original plant produced a couple of strange traps and one that was a "tri-trap". I started the tritrap leaf and this year the youngster put out one double trap! If enough people select for this type of mutation who knows what we may end up with.

Click on the thumbnail to enlarge the photograph.

th_TwintrapcuttingofVftBigmouthtritrap.jpg

Take care,

Steven Stewart

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  • 2 months later...
I can't compete with your double trap, but I think it is worth attempting to breed such things! This is a thumbnail photograph of a Dionaea 'Bigmouth' that I originally got a start of from Bob Ziemer.

The original plant produced a couple of strange traps and one that was a "tri-trap". I started the tritrap leaf and this year the youngster put out one double trap! If enough people select for this type of mutation who knows what we may end up with.

Click on the thumbnail to enlarge the photograph.

th_TwintrapcuttingofVftBigmouthtritrap.jpg

Take care,

Steven Stewart

It doesnt work like that. The DNA is like a plan of a building that the builders use to build a house. The plan is correct ie there is no mutation of the DNA but the builders made a mistake in the construction. If there was a mutation that caused the traps to be double then all the traps would be double as the DNA that codes for the traps is in every single cell.

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It doesnt work like that. The DNA is like a plan of a building that the builders use to build a house. The plan is correct ie there is no mutation of the DNA but the builders made a mistake in the construction. If there was a mutation that caused the traps to be double then all the traps would be double as the DNA that codes for the traps is in every single cell.

How and why some mutations take place may be environmentally stimulated in a specific part of a plant. Often variegation (or other environmentally induced variation) of leaves takes place in an easy to propagate plant, and is then propagated in mass. Mutated material can then be carried forward by selectively separating and propagating the mutated material. This variegation (or unique separation) may only be found on some parts of the propagated material, but still become abundant or valuable enough to propagate. Over time, many horticultural oddities become stable cultivars, if propagated and properly written up in descriptions for accepted for publication. This simple method of selection is common in horticulture. Just because the selected material cannot be propagated by standard Tc methods doesn't mean it can not be, or is not commonly done! If DNA and it's environmental expression in plants was exactly "like a plan of a building" then all leaves of plants would be exactly the same. Like the cute little monotypic Dionaea muscipula!

Take care,

Steven Stewart

Edited by Steve Stewart
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How and why some mutations take place may be environmentally stimulated in a specific part of a plant. Often variegation (or other environmentally induced variation) of leaves takes place in an easy to propagate plant, and is then propagated in mass. Mutated material can then be carried forward by selectively separating and propagating the mutated material. This variegation (or unique separation) may only be found on some parts of the propagated material, but still become abundant or valuable enough to propagate. Over time, many horticultural oddities become stable cultivars, if propagated and properly written up in descriptions for accepted for publication. This simple method of selection is common in horticulture. Just because the selected material cannot be propagated by standard Tc methods doesn't mean it can not be, or is not commonly done! If DNA and it's environmental expression in plants was exactly "like a plan of a building" then all leaves of plants would be exactly the same. Like the cute little monotypic Dionaea muscipula!

Take care,

Steven Stewart

you are correct. I was over simplyfying things to explain the concept of what commonly happens. However, I dont think this is the case with the double traps as I think we would have double trapped mutants by now as Im sure many people around the world have already tried propagating double trapped leaves and even tissue culturing double trapped tissue.

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Looks really weird lol, are double traps triggered seperately or if one closes does the other one too?

Drew,

In the case where the Dionaea traps are complete and on a single petiole the traps close separately, when triggered. When I have had traps that are partially separated, the whole mass triggers and closes, when triggered. I would think there have been instances where Dionaea mutations may cause the traps to be completely non functional.

Mantrid,

I hope all Dionaea growers think as you do! If it hasn't been done by now, it can't be done. I enjoy doing things that haven't been done yet!

The tools that make growing Dionaea and other plant rarities "easy" to grow, have not been around that long. RO, plastic, Tc, the Internet, e-bay, cpukforum etc... are all recent and valuable resources we seem to take for granted.

Take care,

Steven Stewart

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