Sign in to follow this  
Amori

N. x truncata "Queen of Hearts" x "King of Spades"

Recommended Posts

September 11th 2009

200909112.jpg

December 28th 2009

20091228q.jpg

February 22nd 2010

20100222x.jpg

Here's hoping the next one will be over the edge of the pot!

March 25th 2010

20100325.jpg

Another view to get an idea of the size increase. I look forward to each new leaf on this plant :thumright:

20100325b.jpg

July 18th 2010

20100718u.jpg

November 30th 2010

20101130.jpg

20101130p.jpg

A quick update on the maturation of the pitcher, December 20th 2010

img0673h.jpg

Cheers,

Amori

Edited by Amori

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn, now that's what I call fast grower ;)

Can you tell us what are your day/night temps and what medium do you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. I bought mine three months ago or so.... Two new leaves to date. Temperatures 8-12C night 14-23C day greenhouse with 12h photoperiod. Size similar to your pic #1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Major,

Temps are what I would call intermediate to intermittently highland at night. Day temps are 20-25C, night temps usually 10-15C. It's actually started growing faster as I've become lazier to open the window for night time cooling. You can see all the ingredients in that first pic: Lava, rockwool, perlite and a tiny bit of Sphagnum. The plant arrived with its roots in a tiny bit of live Sphagnum, which is what's starting to cover the rest of the surface.

Edited by Amori

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Major,

Temps are what I would call intermediate to intermittently highland at night. Day temps are 20-25C, night temps usually 10-15C. It's actually started growing faster as I've become lazier to open the window for night time cooling.

Thanks Amori, maybe this variety is not that highland after all.

What lights do you use? Pitcher colouration is quite nice - reminds me of mine mikei.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even those labelled as 'highland' varieties appear to like intermediate temperatures.... I'm hoping for a Spring spurt...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeh, they don't seem highland.

I've got two. One grown around 20-24C day & night - grown about same as amori's.

The other, day 13-16C night 8-12C aprox - it's grown a fair bit slower.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great plant! I really like the pics showing a progression of size & color. There are several of these threads on different forums - here's another. Some people are growing this plant in lowland conditions, some highland & some intermediate - it's quite adaptable ...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments.

My enclosure has a 250W 6400K (blue) Envirolite on the left where most Neps are, and a 250W 2700K (red) Envirolite on the right, where the Heliamphora are. This baby sits right in the middle so it gets both. Also, I feed everything with JMC sinking catfish pellets (extremely cheap, nutrient dense and hasn't caused any rotting or foul smells).

Amori

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are in true highland conditions, in my greenhouse in the horrible northern latitude winter.

They have hardly moved since autumn. Like all my mature truncatas (veitchii and burbidgeae) they are stressed by real highland conditions

Fingers crossed for spring.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is some some good results, congrat's!

Although mine produces leaves at a decent rate, they haven't increased in size as much as I would want. When I got it, it did make a quick jump in size, but the following leaves have stayed about the same size. One good thing is that it at least have produced bigger pitchers during this time. I estimate that it has doubled in size since I got it in September. I would say I grow mine in intermediate-warm temps, and I feed it tiny pieces of cricket.

Regards,

Christer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried mine in a cool conservatory, that didn't work, tried it in a terrarium that didn't work, and it was looking a bit rough by this time. Finally put it in a bedroom windowsill and its back on track, got some way to catch up though!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Joey

Yours is looking great. Mine got attacked by some unknown pest. :yes: It has finally recovered and produced 2 leaves larger then the ones it arrived with and produced 1 pitcher with another on the way. Not much color yet, but I am hoping.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Amori,

Since N. truncata is not a hybrid, you can write the name like this:

N. truncata 'Queen of Hearts' x 'King of Spades'

Great looking plant, BTW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dear Amori,

Since N. truncata is not a hybrid, you can write the name like this:

N. truncata 'Queen of Hearts' x 'King of Spades'

Great looking plant, BTW.

But it is not sure it is a hybrid or not yet:)

So by putting it a N. x truncata is more safe:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave,

That's what I initially wrote (it's also on my label) but I changed it after checking Bob Z's Photofinder. That said, I'm confident they're legitimate truncata :smile:

Edited by Amori

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, I feed everything with JMC sinking catfish pellets (extremely cheap, nutrient dense and hasn't caused any rotting or foul smells).

Amori

Hey Amori, do you find the pellets give your Nepenthes a good boost?

Im thinking of picking up a packet soon...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But it is not sure it is a hybrid or not yet:)

So by putting it a N. x truncata is more safe:)

Hello Delwin,

I haven't heard anything about this plant being a hybrid... Just some speculation. Everything about these plants is a solid match for N. truncata. It is true, some people are very impressed by the coloration, but it is just coloration which in the case of N. truncata hasn't been used to define anything about the taxon. N. inermis is something of a different story where all plants have shown the same coloration--rather odd for a Nepenthes.

To me, it seems just about every time a new plant is found, someone mentions that it looks like a hybrid... And then this hybrid theory gets recycled for years but without merit... This, however, doesn't actually make the plant a hybrid, it just makes people confused :thumbsup:

I'm now waiting to hear someone to say how the new species just announced found on Palawan looks like a hybrid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol Dave!! I actually have been speculating if the new species looks like a hybrid between N. attenboroughii and N. matalingajanensis. lol!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry for the late response Mark! As my plants grow indoors, the pellets have so far been the best way for me to feed the plants via pitchers. I've certainly noticed a difference in growth rate and the weedier species are starting to cause problems in such a limited space.

Edited by Amori

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry for the late response Mark! As my plants grow indoors, the pellets have so far been the best way for me to feed the plants via pitchers. I;ve certainly noticed a difference in growth rate and the weedier species are starting to cause problems in such a limited space.

No probs :Laie_98: Thanks for the reply!

Im in the same position as you with regards to indoor growing so anything that'll give them a boost is good.

Fish pellets will be on the menu soon!

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello Delwin,

I haven't heard anything about this plant being a hybrid... Just some speculation. Everything about these plants is a solid match for N. truncata. It is true, some people are very impressed by the coloration, but it is just coloration which in the case of N. truncata hasn't been used to define anything about the taxon. N. inermis is something of a different story where all plants have shown the same coloration--rather odd for a Nepenthes.

To me, it seems just about every time a new plant is found, someone mentions that it looks like a hybrid... And then this hybrid theory gets recycled for years but without merit... This, however, doesn't actually make the plant a hybrid, it just makes people confused :wink:

I'm now waiting to hear someone to say how the new species just announced found on Palawan looks like a hybrid.

Hi Dave,

But there are no root source to proof that it is a pure breed. So it is safer to put it as hybrid rather then pure breed. :) This is best not to confuse unless proven:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Delwin - There is nothing to suggest that the parents are hybrids and if either were, it would likely have shown up in the seedlings. So there is no reason to call these anything but truncata.

Calling them hybrids is what will cause confusion.

But, there is no way to prove beyound doubt that any plant doesn't have a bit of something else in it. So should we call them all possible hybrids - No.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this