Older Leaves On Mexican Pings


Recommended Posts

Possibly, but most of the new plantlets usually grow from the exposed part of the leaf where it was attached to the rosette. From time to time my ping rosettes tend to split into several smaller crowns without any intervention.

Link to post
Share on other sites

P. medusina is a different concept. I'm thinking that when a hobbyist says that their plant clumped that maybe some leaves severed themselves from the mother plant and started new ones, and was probably unseen by the hobbyist, due to the leaves covering the ones that got severed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's relatively easy to tell whether the plant has naturally divided into two (I have seen this regularly in Ping. 'Weser' and P. emarginata x 'Weser'), or whether you had a plantlet grow vegetatively from a leaf: natural clumping produces plants that are all of similar sizes: A single growing point becomes two, and the leaves being produced from these are more or less the same size in each plant.

Plants that form from detached leaflets start out microscopically small, which is a bit of a giveaway. They take much longer (years) to get to a similar size to the mother plant.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, my agnata produced plantlets from a leaf attached to the crown. I like to keep my clean of drying leafs, When I pulled it out I saw the little plantlets developing and putted it soil, now they reached the surface. It looks like this at the moment:

p1000814g.th.jpg

Also, after flowering it divided, having two growing points:

p1000808l.th.jpg

Edited by goldeye3002
Link to post
Share on other sites
Unlikely; more usually it is simply natural division of the plant from what I see. I guess if you drop one on the floor then it might happen!

That's never happened to ME before!

Link to post
Share on other sites
I think it's relatively easy to tell whether the plant has naturally divided into two (I have seen this regularly in Ping. 'Weser' and P. emarginata x 'Weser'), or whether you had a plantlet grow vegetatively from a leaf: natural clumping produces plants that are all of similar sizes: A single growing point becomes two, and the leaves being produced from these are more or less the same size in each plant.

Plants that form from detached leaflets start out microscopically small, which is a bit of a giveaway. They take much longer (years) to get to a similar size to the mother plant.

Like this? I just happen to have a 2-crown plant in stock:

Picture001-4.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Jim,

It looks like one of the crowns is heavily dominant over the other. I haven't seen that many plants where the division produces two identical size crowns, just similar, but not often 'siamese twins'.

By comparison leaf-grown plantlets will be a similar size to the plants that grow from artificially pulled leaf cuttings, i.e. a couple of mm across for starters. This is all just my experience, however, others may have seen different...

M

Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you think I should separate them, now or later on?

I usually do it at repotting time, when new carnivorous growth starts. Yours seems to still be producing carnivorous leaves, so maybe just when active growth is obvious. I think it pays to be patient until the crowns are fully separated (for a time after they split they remain two crowns of the same plant). The reason for this is I find Pings are more likely to rot for me (from the crown out) if I shock them or significantly damage the roots while dormant.

I would also always at this stage take a few leaf cuttings for insurance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL! I'm in the leaf cutting business! I've got youngin's in another pot. I'm in no hurry to separate them. I'm surprised that they never went succulent for me, even though many of the other plants in the tray did.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jim:

I think I've seen both types of growth on my plants. New plants usually come from:

1. Crown division, usually as summer growth transitions into winter growth. My P. x 'John Rizzi' is doing this now.

2. Small plantlets which come up around the base of the plant. This usually happens after repotting, or when the leaves have been roughly disturbed. I think it comes from leaves whose bases have been severed or disturbed enough during repotting to trigger plantlet production. My P. x ( gigantea x moctezumae ) is doing this now following a rough repotting a month or so ago.

FWIW.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oddly enough, my John Rizzi has had humongous leaves this winter, while potosciensis, gypsicola, and George Sargent all went winter rosettes.

Picture047.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim:

I think I've seen both types of growth on my plants. New plants usually come from:

1. Crown division, usually as summer growth transitions into winter growth. My P. x 'John Rizzi' is doing this now.

2. Small plantlets which come up around the base of the plant. This usually happens after repotting, or when the leaves have been roughly disturbed. I think it comes from leaves whose bases have been severed or disturbed enough during repotting to trigger plantlet production. My P. x ( gigantea x moctezumae ) is doing this now following a rough repotting a month or so ago.

FWIW.

I agree. I have also noticed that small plantlets come up around the base after a rather rough repotting. It also seems to happen very commonly with potting up new plants which are just out of tissue culture. I have four species/hybrids just out of TC and they all have produced numerous plantlets after potting up (the plantlets were not present prior to potting).

Link to post
Share on other sites

What I think is funny is to have a single leaf produce many sprouts.... and that without adding any growing medium. P. 'Aphrodite' and P. gypsicola did that for me last year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...

Apparently older surviving leaves can initiate plantlets. I wonder if this is a mechanism that works in situ like it does in cultivation.

Here is a photo of a pot of Pinguicula esseriana taken from two angles showing how what was initially only one large plant, is quickly becoming a large plant surrounded by smaller plants which appear to be uprooting and dislodging the parent plant --->

P_esseriana_clump.jpg

I believe the older leaves that these plantlets originated from are still attached to the parent plant, but I'm not sure they are still alive. I can't even be certain they aren't initiated from buds on the stem instead of buds formed on the leaves.

Edited by Joseph Clemens
Link to post
Share on other sites

I expect it does work in native habitat as an effective means of propagation. Given their opportunistic and partially 'epiphytic' nature, I expect natural propagation to include detachment of plantlets and leaves. I have noticed that my P. jaumavensis clone regularly 'pushes out' and naturally detaches leaves which would, naturally, blow away or fall below.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.