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johns

D. rotundifolia, D. anglica, D. x obovata (update: added winter pictures)

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Went on a trip today to a bog in Østmarka, the forested area to the east of Oslo.

The bog:

myr.jpeg

On basically every square meter of bog you can see grew round-leafed sundew. It was nearly impossible to avoid stepping on them.

rundsoldogg.jpeg

In the middle of the bog was a wetter area, where I found english/great sundew.

myr2.jpeg

smalsoldogg_oversikt.jpeg

smalsoldogg.jpeg

smalsoldogg2.jpeg

smalsoldogg3.jpeg

smalsoldogg4.jpeg

Aquatic sundews? :)

smalsoldogg_vann.jpeg

I also found the below plants, which I think are D. x obovata, the natural hybrid between round-leafed and english sundew.

It's not easy to tell whether one has found x obovata or intermedia, to me they look very much the same. Supposedly intermedia has stripes on the seed capsule, and the flower stalks emerge from the side of the rosette (in the hybrid it emerges in the middle). Unfortunately I didn't remember to check, and I can't tell from the pictures.

x_oversikt.jpeg

x_blad.jpeg

x_fro.jpeg

x_fro2.jpeg

These grew in a slightly different place. Same as the ones above?

y1.jpeg

y_fro.jpeg

Edit: fixed round-leafed sundew URL.

Edited by johns

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Great to see Norwegian Drosera again! Also, I'm glad you found D. anglica as far south as Oslo! I was unable to find any south of Norfjord a couple years ago, although D. rotundifolia was everywhere in shpagnum bogs along with P. vulgaris; perhaps you saw a few of them too in these areas. They are supposed to grow with P. alpina, but I never found any in my searches, which were mostly around Bergen, my home town. Yes, that is D. obovata! I never found ANY D. intermedia in Norway at all, (their leaves are narrower). Where I found D. anglica and D. rotundifolia growing together, these D. obovata hybrids were not uncommon. Amazing how the D. anglica grew in such wet areas, sometimes underwater or by small streams in very wet detritus. - Rich

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Great report and some excellent pics of drosera in habitat - thanks for sharing with us :Laie_99:

Heather

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Great to see Norwegian Drosera again! Also, I'm glad you found D. anglica as far south as Oslo! I was unable to find any south of Norfjord a couple years ago, although D. rotundifolia was everywhere in shpagnum bogs along with P. vulgaris; perhaps you saw a few of them too in these areas. They are supposed to grow with P. alpina, but I never found any in my searches, which were mostly around Bergen, my home town. Yes, that is D. obovata! I never found ANY D. intermedia in Norway at all, (their leaves are narrower). Where I found D. anglica and D. rotundifolia growing together, these D. obovata hybrids were not uncommon. Amazing how the D. anglica grew in such wet areas, sometimes underwater or by small streams in very wet detritus. - Rich

I've only recently started to get interested in CPs, so I haven't looked that much, but my impression so far is that D. anglica is quite common in sunny bogs with wet areas like you see on the pictures. I found D. anglica and D. x obovata last weekend as well on another bog, and I know of a third bog where they grow (all in Østmarka).

Unfortunately I didn't see P. vulgaris there. They do grow in Østmarka, but they don't seem to be as easy to find as sundew. I have seen P. vulgaris in two places in Østmarka, but I didn't find them by myself (I had the GPS coordinates, from artsobservasjoner.no). From what I've been told P. vulgaris is more common further north and in higher altitudes. At one of the P. vulgaris locales they grew alongside D. rotundifolia, but from what I've read P. vulgaris prefers medium to rich bogs, and doesn't grow in nutrient-poor bogs (like sundew does). I'm actually slightly more interested in finding butterworts. :)

There has been quite a bit of rain recently, so the bog on the pictures is probably a lot wetter than usual.

Thanks for the nice comments. :)

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I found hundreds of P. vulgaris near sea level in a few islands just west of Bergen growing with D. rotundifolia in various sphannum pits where several aquatic Utrics also occurred in small ponds. I found more Pings in and near Voss, in higher elevations, but no D. anglica, perhaps they grew there, I just didn't find any in the short time I had there. I heard that P. alpina and possibly P. villosa grew there, but all I found were D. rotundifolia in sphagnum, and P. vulgaris growing in gravel and near small stream embankments. - Rich

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All these pictures of CP in their natural habitat are really fascinating and beautiful. Thanx for sharing! :-)

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I visited the bog again today, to see how it looks like during the winter. It's been a nice winter so far here in Oslo; I think there was about 30 cm of snow covering the bog, insulating the plants (hibernacula) from the freezing temperatures. So far this winter temperatures have been as low as -20 degrees celsius (-3 today).

I tried to take pictures approximately where I took pictures back in august. Enjoy. :)

Overview of the bog, winter:

IMG_0001.JPG

IMG_0002.JPG

IMG_0006.JPG

Summer:

myr.jpeg

rundsoldogg.jpeg

English sundew area, winter:

IMG_0009.JPG

Summer:

myr2.jpeg

Approximately where a cluster of D. x obovata grow, winter:

IMG_0012.JPG

Summer:

y1.jpeg

A tree in the forest:

IMG_0013.JPG

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Wow that looks amazing, we do not get a lot of snow in Australia. I would be interested to know how cold the ground gets under the snow. I know snow insulates but it would still have to be bellow freezing. I wonder how cold the Drosera can go?

Cheers

George

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Wow that looks amazing, we do not get a lot of snow in Australia. I would be interested to know how cold the ground gets under the snow. I know snow insulates but it would still have to be bellow freezing. I wonder how cold the Drosera can go?

From http://soil.scijournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/67/4/1234 :

Snow kept the soil warm and reduced soil temperature variability, but often this caused soil to remain near 0°C, resulting in more freeze–thaw events under snow at one or more soil depths. During the ‘cold snowy’ winter, soils under snow had daily averages consistently >0°C, whereas snow-free soil temperatures commonly dropped below -3°C.

This may also be of interest: http://scienceandsarcasm.blogspot.com/2005...-does-snow.html

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