Ceph arrived in the post


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I just got a Cephalotus that arrive today, It looks healthy and I will post a pic when I get home from work (on my lunch break). What tips/advice should I take to ensure it stays healthy and what things should I do as it arrived in the post and the pitchers are probably empty due to spillage. Should I refill them or leave them alone ?

Any help or advice would be great as this is my first plant and I will obviously do some more research today and tonight regarding the care of these plants.

Such a funky looking plant :smile: looks like a E.T. !!! Im so excited haha

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I just got a Cephalotus that arrive today, It looks healthy and I will post a pic when I get home from work (on my lunch break). What tips/advice should I take to ensure it stays healthy and what things should I do as it arrived in the post and the pitchers are probably empty due to spillage. Should I refill them or leave them alone ?

Any help or advice would be great as this is my first plant and I will obviously do some more research today and tonight regarding the care of these plants.

Such a funky looking plant :D looks like a E.T. !!! Im so excited haha

Upon planting it in its proper media (various sphagnum, sphagnum peat, sand, and perlite mixtures -- most anything acidic and quick-draining) in a pot initially too large for the Cephalotus, I would add a tiny amount of water to the pitchers with an eye-dropper; though the plant will produce its own fluids in time. Without the water, some of the pitchers may wither.

Keeping the plant particularly humid as it settles in can also be beneficial, and some grower use plastic bags or inverted -- ventilated -- clear plastic cups. Also, providing a shaded environment with diffused natural lighting should also be considered, though grow-lights can also be used without shading . . .

If the Cephalotus arrived bare-root, it will take take a few weeks to settle in and produce new growth. Cephalotus does everything in its own time, so some patience is necessary . . .

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Thank you.

It came potted so I will leave it a week or so and repot it into a bigger pot. What soil mix would you use and what different ingredients could I use as some are hard to find like Sphagnum and peat moss. Is coir ok to use or peat pellets mixed with other ingredients ???

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Thank you.

It came potted so I will leave it a week or so and repot it into a bigger pot. What soil mix would you use and what different ingredients could I use as some are hard to find like Sphagnum and peat moss. Is coir ok to use or peat pellets mixed with other ingredients ???

If it arrived potted, leave it in place for the time being. I wouldn't necessarily re-pot just to do so; and I wouldn't attempt to substitute proper compost ingredients. Most of my Cephalotus grow in various peat, sphagnum, and sand mixes; and I would avoid coir (some coir contain a great deal of sodium) and peat pellets. That peat is so difficult to obtain come as a surprise but I would wait on the re-potting until I could obtain proper materials.

Cephalotus are slow to grow, so there is little real hurry . . .

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Glad you've got one, don't forget to show us some pictures. The above advice is right ,let the plant settle into it's new home. When you decide to repot into a larger pot ( I like 7x5" rose pots ) here's a link that will give you a recipe for a great mix http://www.aqph26.dsl.pipex.com/cephalotusfollil.html

Buy canna coco professional, it's had all and any harmful salts washed out of it.

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What's the purpose of the 25% coir in the mix in the above link?

Coir is seen by some as a more "sustainable" substitute for sphagnum moss (considering it is simply a byproduct of coconut processing and not harvested outright from threatened wetlands), and is frequently used in composts due to its beneficial bacteria and fungi (Aspergillis, among others) and anti-pathogenic fungal properties; but not all coir is of "created" equally, and products from coconut plantations nearer the sea possess -- as you may well expect -- an overabundance of sodium. I know of a commercial grower in the US who lost an entire crop of Nepenthes to supposedly high-quality, "sodium-free" coir . . .

Edited by loligo1964
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