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I have selected a few clones of N.bokorensis from the seeds I raised, and thought I'd share some pics showing the diversity within this species.

Standard (long pitcher coppery red colour)

bokorimg0007.jpg

Heavy red-veined

bokorimg00021.jpg

Green thick-set

bokorimg00011.jpg

Squat Red

bokorimg0002.jpg

bokorimg0012.jpg

Booty!

bokorimg0003.jpg

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This is why raising Nepenthes from seed is SO rewarding! I noticed similar diversity in several species that I've raised from seed over the years; some squat, some elongated, some more green, some more red, some with wider peristomes, and the list goes on and on. Well done! Keep on growing. Let's see what tomorrow brings! :biggrin: - Rich

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Where was I when all this happened?

N. bokorensis is very nice looking. Sure to be in demand for the years coming.

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Hello,

Rich has said it all.

Growing from seeds can be so rewarding indeed.

Your plants look very promising Dicon! I must say the "squat red" is really pretty.

Do you grow your bokorensis in "pure "highland conditions? How large are they?

Mine grow in lowland conditions.

I have also hardened two clones in my living-room. I grew them as house plants for almost a year and now, they are out in the garden, amongst the Sarracenia and Dioneae! I shall take a picture sometime.

Rich, what are the species in which you also observed variatons as seedlings?

François.

Edited by Sockhom
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Hi Francois,

I am growing mostly in lowland and intermediate, I have found my highland conditions a bit chilly, but they do survive there.

Most of the plants have a lamina length of about 180 -200mm and 35mm wide.

I do however have one with wide leaves at 50+mm.

My largest plant is the "heavy red veined" and that grows in intermediate conditions with higher light levels (next to this plant grows the "Green thick set" which has a smaller more robust habit)

I'll post a few pics later.

The root stocks are quite fat too, have you tried letting one die back to see if it recovers?

Edited by Dicon

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Rich, what are the species in which you also observed variatons as seedlings?

François.

Hey François,

Lots of species over the years, really, but I first noticed it with all the seed that I was getting from the Turnbull-Middleton expeditions. First with the Lake Poso forms of N. maxima that Dave Evans wrote about in the last issue of CPN, and then in a batch of N. fusca that was collected on Kota Kinabalu, where some came up anywhere from lime green, with green peristomes, while others had stripes and even turned a solid red, some wide peristomes and some small. The species from Sumatra also produced some surprises, including a few sports, one N. carunculata seedling produced a solid red first pitcher right after the cotyledons! Even the Malayan Penn. species such as N. sanguinia (especially those from the Genting Highlands) were also very variable. Many seedlings had so much diversity, that no two seedlings were exactly alike, even lowland species. Differences in the tendrils, color, peristomes and shape of the pitcher itself (some squat, some more elongated) were very common, even the leaf itself, some all red, some short, and some quite large. Curiously, when I asked John Turnbull if he noticed any such diversity in the population of plants from which he harvested those seed, he said "No, they were remarkably uniform." The ONLY exception he mentioned was in a form of N. maxima in Sulawesi, with wavy leaf margins. He spotted a single plant that had compound undulations on its leaf margin, and a solid red leaf. He said it stuck out from the rest of the population like a sore thumb; this is known as "N. maxima - 2"; and is still not very common in collections. Still, there are some species that have less diversity in their seedlings than others. - Rich

Edited by rsivertsen

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My little collection of 12 Boschianas are showing some variation also, most are green with nicely red pitchers and but one or two are turning out to be dark red all over, leaves and pitchers, if in a few months it turns out to be a stable variation ill post some piccies.

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Fine looking pitchers. None of my plants show the intense red coloration on the pitchers as your "red squat". That one is a definite keeper. Interesting also to see that most of your plants are showing the vaulted lid.

Interesting hearing about the "N. maxima -2". From the description is appears to be similar to the form that Stewart McPherson found on Mt Sesean - with the difference that the plants from this population were uniform (all having brownish leaves and wavy leaf margin). Only the pitcher color differed, something that has become apparent among my plants (which still are young though). So far there is not much difference between the seedlings when comparing the foliage, unlike my N. maxima (s.e. of Lore Lindu). Among them the variation is more obvious - from the leaf shape to the color.

Manders,

I see color variation as well as difference in shape on my boschianas also. I will have to wait to see what will happen as they matures before making a conclusion about the variation. According to Ch'ien Lee there were lots of variation among the seedlings that were grown by MT. I questioned him about the origin of their stock and he said that they were from G. Sakumbang (he didn't know if their current stock where from the same collection though). Since the seed distributed by Stewart McPherson came from the same location, it is likely that these will show some variation as well.

Regards,

Christer

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Guest Fortaleza

Hi,

I am from Brazil and one friend have one plant that looks like with N. bokorensis "Squat Red". I´d like to have sure about this identification.

Sorry because my bad english.

These are its pictures:

http://img38.imageshack.us/my.php?image=og...ynsvwjmpzfz.jpg

http://img38.imageshack.us/my.php?image=og...fxlknm0zvvg.jpg

http://img38.imageshack.us/my.php?image=og...8fj55c3y7df.jpg

http://img38.imageshack.us/my.php?image=og...yb9gtfgzba1.jpg

Thanks a lot. :thumbsup:

Fortaleza

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Hi Fortaleza!

we should know:

-the plant is grown from seed or from cutting (check its base to see if it was from cutting)?

-where was it purchased (market, specialized nursery or collector)?

-can we see some photos of the leaf tips of all the leaves (last third will be enough)?

marcello

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Guest Fortaleza

Hi Marcelo,

The plant is growing from cutting.

It was purchased from Marcos Ono (Brazilian collector). He sells as N thorelliX(thorelliXthorelli). But I think that it is wrong.

I will post new pictures of leaves and new pitcher soon.

Regards,

Fortaleza.

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I've got a new cam and here is one of my first pics. I hope it's ok to post a photo here. I don't want to open a new thread for it. This is of my second biggest bokorensis. I think it's already an intermediate pitcher. I call it "Big Hat" ;)

bokor_big_hat.jpg

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Hi Boris,

That's a nice pitcher!

How long is it?

And how large are your plants now?

If my memory serves me well, you had the biggest seed grown bokorensis around!

Truly,

François.

Edited by Sockhom

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That's a nice pitcher!

How long is it?

And how large are your plants now?

If my memory serves me well, you had the seed grown biggest bokorensis around!

Hi François,

The pitcher is nearly 10 cm.

I guess my bokor family is shivering when I come near to them. Last year I managed to kill the both medium plants while I was spraying an insecticid and hit the both with the spray from a very near distance. They got frozen and never recovered from my very dumb and unconcentrated action ... doh. The biggest bokor I managed to break this year while moving it from the basement to the greenhouse. Nevertheless I've got now four rooted cuttings of it and the plant had already two basals. It now produced a third basal and a sideshot. Here is a photo of it and a photo of the plant with the nice pitcher. This one has also produced two basals.

bokor_big1.jpg

bokor_big2.jpg

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Hi Boris,

I too have found bokorensis very sensitive to chemicals, the slightest contact and the leaves just fry turning crisp in days!

Some updated pictures

Broad leaf

bokupimg0005.jpg

Squat Red

bokupimg0004.jpg

Nice wide combe on this one

bokupimg0003.jpg

Robust

bokupimg0002.jpg

Red Heavy Veined, the longest pitcher at 13cm

bokupimg0001.jpg

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Hi Boris,

I too have found bokorensis very sensitive to chemicals, the slightest contact and the leaves just fry turning crisp in days!

It was a so called natural insecticid based on chrysanthenum. So I've thought that they were iced by the spray. On the other hand they proofed very hard and are growing in very wide temperature range.

Here is a pic of the little mushroom pitcherling. It also increased in size and has now also about 13 cm.

bokor_hat03.jpg

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Hi,

I'd like to reactivate this post to show one of my plants. It is grown behind a windowsill (with extra-tubes) during winter and is grown outside, between May and October, among my Sarracenia. It gets full sun between dawn to 4 pm. It is the second summer I grow it outside and it does very well. Intermediate pitchers are on their way and I hope it will flower this year.

p1160306.jpg

p1160307.jpg

p1160312.jpg

p1160310.jpg

p1160316.jpg

Cheers,

François.

Edited by Sockhom

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Yes, that's a great plant, the best in cultivation I've seen so far. I really believe the tough conditions are so much better for these plants, big pot, open air, full sun... They grow so much better than in all our ultra-protected closed environments.... Ahhhh, if I had a garden... Dave's plant, also growing outdoor, looks very good... Mate, I'm sure you would have similar results with all the other IC sisters...

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Great looking N. bokor. Thanks for the idea of growing them outdoor. Mine were sitting crowded in the basement. Now they have a new place on the terrace.

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