Cephalotus Follicularis seed stratification


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Hello all,

I have recently obtained some cephalotus seed from the CPS Seed Bank. I have sown them in small plastic pots one with chopped live sphagnum moss and the other a mix of peat, sand & perlite and covered with small plastic bags as instructed. I plan on growing them in a small mini growhouse with my other CPs but Im unsure if the seeds need stratification as have read some people do stratify and some dont??

so was hoping for a little guidance from anyone with experience of growing these wonderful plants??

Thanks in advance

Timmi

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Hi Timmi,

it's up to you. Before I sowed my Cephalotus seeds, I put them to the fridge for about 2-3 months.

After 14 days on a windowsill 5 seeds germinated. I have had a plastic bag on the pot since I put it on the windowsill.

So I recommend stratification because I have had a success with it. Hope more than 5 seeds will germinate.

Perhaps this can be useful for you.

I know, my English could be better. :)

I wish you success in growing cephalotus from seeds. ;)

Best regards.

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I have sown both stratified and non-stratified seeds of Cephalotus with about equal success either way, with about a 70% germination rate . Unless you harvest the seeds yourself, their age and viability -- they have a fairly short shelf life -- may often be at issue; and the best bet for germination -- in my experience -- would be to sow them outright . . .

Peter D'Amato, in his book, The Savage Garden, recommended either method -- as far back as 1998, "the viability of the [Cephalotus] seed is not long, so if you refrigerate them, do so for no longer than two to four months, or sow immediately . . .

Good luck . . .

Hello all,

I have recently obtained some cephalotus seed from the CPS Seed Bank. I have sown them in small plastic pots one with chopped live sphagnum moss and the other a mix of peat, sand & perlite and covered with small plastic bags as instructed. I plan on growing them in a small mini growhouse with my other CPs but Im unsure if the seeds need stratification as have read some people do stratify and some dont??

so was hoping for a little guidance from anyone with experience of growing these wonderful plants??

Thanks in advance

Timmi

Edited by loligo1964
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I have have decided to give them a go outside without stratification in my mini growhouse where they are covered with small plastic bags to help humidity, should i place them at the top of the growhouse or lower down where they wont receive full sun?? and also has anyone had success with a heated propagator or is this not advised with cephalotus??

thanks for the help already guys

Timmi

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I have have decided to give them a go outside without stratification in my mini growhouse where they are covered with small plastic bags to help humidity, should i place them at the top of the growhouse or lower down where they wont receive full sun?? and also has anyone had success with a heated propagator or is this not advised with cephalotus??

thanks for the help already guys

Timmi

I would recommend indirect sunlight to avoid cooking the pots. Treat the seeds as you would leaf-cuttings and they should be fine. I have used heating mats off-season when germinating seeds and rooting cuttings, but would not use any heating element this time of year, unless it's tremendously cold where you are . . .

Keep us posted . . .

Edited by loligo1964
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  • 1 year later...

I don't understand why anyone stratifies Ceph seed, unless they are in the tropics or subtropical areas. It is not something that I could imagine happening in nature, not at the recommended temperature that I have seen put forward. Apart from the odd blast of Antartic wind, it would not be likely to get that cold in their native range, as it is further north than where I live, and our local plants don't require any such treatment to germinate.

Checking Albany's climate stats, the mean low in winter is 8 oC, so I can't see why it would help to keep seed below 4 oC when they have such a short storage life. A cool spot other than the fridge may be just as good. However, I am yet to be able to try it myself, so there may be something that I have missed.

I have heard of people sowing the seed and then keeping the pots fairly cool to sitmuate germination. Maybe this a good compromise for those in warmer climates.

Edited by Marcus B
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