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Andreas Fleischmann

Drosera stenopetala and D. uniflora

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Hello Drosera-lovers,

These are two hardy, cold-loving Drosera species (which, indeed are closely related sisters, and which naturally thrive in the cold conditions of the subantarctic southern hemisphere).

Drosera stenopetala, from New Zealand

Dstenopetala_01.jpg

The leaves formed early in spring are short-stalked and form a flat rosette. Later the season the leaves have longer petioles and are held erect.

Dstenopetala_07.jpg

Dstenopetala_08.jpg

The single white flower develops on a long entirely glabrous scape. Interestingly, its pedulous in bud, and the strange sepals are dark green, almost black, with curled and overlapping margins.

Dstenopetala_03.jpg

Dstenopetala_04.jpg

Dstenopetala_02.jpg

Drosera uniflora is endemic to the subantarctic part of South America. These plants were grown from seed originating from the Falkland Islands.

Duniflora_01.jpg

Duniflora_03.jpg

The small white flowers are produced solitary on a scape. Like in D. stenopetala, the sepals are very interesting and unique in the whole genus: they are distinctly petiolate and cup-like.

Duniflora_04.jpg

Duniflora_02.jpg

Usually, plants of D. uniflora are dark red when growing in full sun. However, all attempts of mine to grow this species in full sun outdoors failed so far. The plants really seem to dislike hot summer temperatures. Thus I grow them partially shaded with some of my temperate Pinguicula species outdoors. This results in dull green plants, however they grow well (but awefully slow!).

Both species are kept outdoors under my conditions year round. In winter, they are usually covered with snow for at least 3 months, and stand temperatures down to at least -20°C without problems. However I can only keep the pots outside in winter as long as they are protected by a snow cover, as the plants are not tolerant of freezing. I have already lost several plants from draught and damage due to freezing after some black frosts. Remember that the natural habitats are regions with high precipitation, and therefore are covered by a thick snow-layer all winter.

All the best,

Andreas

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Beautiful pictures! It's really amazing how similar and at the same time unique these 2 species are.

OK, now show us pictures of Venezuela!!! :)

Best wishes, Fernando

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Great pictures, thanks.

I haven't seen too much of these species.

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Hi Andreas,

Very nice plants with interesting ( weird :wink: ) sepals !!

Thanks for sharing your cultivation methods for these species. :wink:

I have a few D.stenopetala and I grow them in a frost-free greenhouse,but

the temperatures are rising quickly ,so I think it's better to put them outside when

the nighttemperatures are above zero degrees.

Are the flowers self fertile?

Thanks for sharing.

Iggy

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Hi Andreas,

wonderful pictures of very nice looking species. :wink:

What a pity that here in Bochum we have almost never snow to cover the plants during winter, so it´s nearly impossible to grow these species. The temperatures are low (this winter down to -18°C) but no snow. :wink:

Best regards,

Dani

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Hello Andreas,

your plants are magnificent. I love these two species.

Thanks for sharing the pictures.

Dani: Perhaps you could keep them in a fridge during the winter months. :)

Just an idea.

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