Will they make it?


Guest Gratz
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hi my sarracenia mostly flava and dionaea are being kept in a unheated geenhouse.They are now all frozen solid and have been for 3 days! i have put hay on the dionaea.so as the title says will they make it!

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hi my sarracenia mostly flava and dionaea are being kept in a unheated geenhouse.They are now all frozen solid and have been for 3 days! i have put hay on the dionaea.so as the title says will they make it!

I would get a small paraffin heater from garden centre to be on safe side and light on really cold nights or bring them in on frosty nights.

In your case I would bring them in any case and thaw them out to see what state they are in. If when thawed the leaves are soft and soggy then you have probably lost them (dionaea), but hold onto them until spring just in case.

Edited by mantrid
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They'll be fine being frozen for weeks or months on end. Every collection in the country would be destroyed in one harsh winter otherwise.

I would also advise against thawing them out. A sure fire way to kill dionaea is by bringing in the frozen block and thawing it out far too quickly in a warm house.

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They'll be fine being frozen for weeks or months on end. Every collection in the country would be destroyed in one harsh winter otherwise.

I would also advise against thawing them out. A sure fire way to kill dionaea is by bringing in the frozen block and thawing it out far too quickly in a warm house.

I had no idea that dionaea can be frozen solid for months on end. Has anyone tested this?

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I have had Dionaea outside all year round, and under 6" of snow before now, with no problems. They are a lot more resiliant than people give them credit for.

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Over here it is freezing for one week now.

At night we get -10 degrees Celsius.

And near the ground it was last Tuesday -18.

And all is doing fine, I hope....

I've brought mine it for the nights, and with even colder weather forcasted I might keep them in all day.(cool place)

I am keeping my fingers crossed for an Elfstedentocht though, I just love it.(to watch, not to ride one):thank_you2:

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never lost a (hardy) plant to temperature, wet and closed conditions are the real enemies. my louvre vents stay open 24/7/365 to keep the air moving and as the temps are low nothings actively growing so i wouldn't even be tempted to water even if there looking dry. sit back stop worring and begin enjoying your hobby it'll soon be spring (i hope! brrrrrrrr)

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Well I havent checked on my plants fully outside or the ones in my unheated greenhouse - I'm sure they'll be fine but its too cold to spend much time outside. I havent risked the rarer plants outside or any of the smaller vfts (these are in my very cold but frost free conservatory). I trust the above opinions though and I'm sure they'd all be ok outside in an unheated greenhouse - well perhaps apart from some of the pygmy vfts. I'm overcautious by nature anyway!

I heard it was the coldest winter here for 13 years, or was it the coldest December in 13 years? One of those anyway :thank_you2: Roll on spring!

Heather

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I reside in the UK (Essex, for my sins !) I keep venus fly traps, sundews, cobra lilies, various sarracenia in a unheated greenhouse. I used to heat the greenhouse at night in cold spells but for for the last few years I haven`t bothered.

Instead , if it is likely to be really cold I place old net curtains over the plants. The advantages of this are ;they are light (won`t crush the plants), mould to the shape of the plants, let the air in,let the light in & keep the worst of the frosts off the plants. & they don`t cost anything . So far I have not used them this year but if temperatures are forecast to to be very low I will do. I have never lost a single specimen of any of the above species of carnivorous plants in the winter through using this method.

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