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Daniel O.

D. schwackei in flower

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Hello,

in the moment my D. schwackei ´Diamantina, Minas Gerais, Brazil´ (yes, it´s not longer D. montana var. schwackei) is in flower. :thumright:

It´s growing under artificial light.

Of course i took several pictures from the plant itself, the emerging flower stalk and the flowers from several sights.

The flower stalk and the sepals are really very hairy, similar to D. camporupestris D. chrysolepis, D. kaieteurensis, D. tomentosa.....

I really like these hairy flower stalks.:yes:

Perhaps the flower colour is a little bit darker, but only a little bit.

Here are the pictures, i hope you´ll like them.

first sign, the hairy thing in the middle of the plant

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a few days later

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about a week later

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this way it looks in the moment

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and here the fully opened flower

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the flower is beginning to close

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the almost fully closed flower

P1060494a.jpg

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Great Photography, Dani ~

Hairly flower stalks are always attactive to me as well ~ :thumright:

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Hi Dany,

You are a magician, beautiful plant, nice flower.

Did you try any self pollinisation or hybridation ?

Lolo

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Lovely sequence of photos Dani, beautiful as always!

Must admit, I do like the hairy flower stalks too - they always make interesting photos.

Heather

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Many thanks to all of you for your kind words. :tu:

Laurent, of course i´ve self pollinated it, i hope it will work like it works for all the other hairy ones, but normally it should also work without my help. :thumright:

Till now only the first flower has opened, 2 others will follow these days.

Hybridisation i´ve not tried, but it should not work with a lot of other Drosera, perhaps with their nearest relatives, like D. tentaculata or D. graminifolia, perhaps also D. tomentosa or D. montana, but i´m not really sure.

In the moment a lot of my D. tomentosa, tomentosa var. glabrata, kaiteurensis and "D. esmeraldae" are also in flower, and D. graomogolensis and D. ascendens are starting to flower these days too. :yes:

Jens, these days i´ll show also some pictures from "D. esmeraldae, Cerro Duida", but the flowers are much smaller and it was relatively difficult to take good pictures.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Dear Daniel,

Congrats!

It seems like your plant (in vitro from Kamil or seed-grown?) is a little bit faster than my plant, which I grew from seed that Fernando sent me 2 years ago. My plants still look like yours on photo number 3 ;). Thus I will have to be patient... ;)

Hybridisation i´ve not tried, but it should not work with a lot of other Drosera,

Why? I have tried several Drosera crossings over the last 10 years or so, and I made the experience that you can litterally hybridize any species, as long as you stay within the section borders! For example, crosses between D. ascendens and D. slackii, or D. capensis and D. graminifolia did produce viable seed. The seedlings are still too small, but they are growing! Same for "strange" crosses that fellow CPers made, like D. neocaledonica x spatulata, or D. neocaledponica x aliciae.

All the best,

Andreas

Edited by Andreas Fleischmann

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Thanks to both of you :yes: ,

Andreas, i received my motherplant from Matthias about 14 months ago, it was a very small plantlett. Surely he has grown them from seed, perhaps the same seed you have sown out.

Till now Kamil has not offered this species.

From the beginning it was a relatively easy growing plant under my conditions :wink: , it´s now about 3 cm in diameter and it´s beginning to form a little stem.

Are your plants from the same location?

So you suggest to make some hybrids, why not?

Theoretically it should be possible within the Drosera section, but i´ve never tried it before. :wink:

I think the next flower will open tomorrow or the day after, i think that i will have at the same time open flowers from D. ascendens and deep red coloured D. tomentosa, so i can try it with the next or perhaps the last flower. :yes:

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hello Dani,

Congrats with the first flowers,always stunning ones with the hairy sepals and flower stalk.

If you go for a crossing with the last flower, try it with your D.ascendens :wink: . It would make the flower stalk of

D.ascendens also hairy . :wink:

Why? I have tried several Drosera crossings over the last 10 years or so, and I made the experience that you can litterally hybridize any species, as long as you stay within the section borders! For example, crosses between D. ascendens and D. slackii, or D. capensis and D. graminifolia did produce viable seed. The seedlings are still too small, but they are growing! Same for "strange" crosses that fellow CPers made, like D. neocaledonica x spatulata, or D. neocaledponica x aliciae.

Hello Andreas,

Thanks for the hint , I've also tried a few crossings this and last year. But always within the section borders.

Section Ergaleium and Lasiosephala are for me the tricky ones . I had succes in pollinating the flowers and

viable seeds,but the germination was not always fine.

Section Drosera is for me the easy section. I have made D.collinsiae x D.aliciae and have seedlings of D.venusta x

D.madagascariensis.Both species are growing fine.

I've never tried South-American Drosera with South-africans , so I will try it next time. D.madagascariensis x

D.montana var. tomentosa must be ..... :yes:

Do you have pictures of any hybrids made by yourself except that beautiful D.esterhuyseniae x D. slackii?

Dani,thanks for sharing them!!

Regards,

Iggy

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Hello Dani,

Congrats with the first flowers,always stunning ones with the hairy sepals and flower stalk.

If you go for a crossing with the last flower, try it with your D.ascendens :wink: . It would make the flower stalk of

D.ascendens also hairy . :wink:

Hello Andreas,

Thanks for the hint , I've also tried a few crossings this and last year. But always within the section borders.

Section Ergaleium and Lasiosephala are for me the tricky ones . I had succes in pollinating the flowers and

viable seeds,but the germination was not always fine.

Section Drosera is for me the easy section. I have made D.collinsiae x D.aliciae and have seedlings of D.venusta x

D.madagascariensis.Both species are growing fine.

I've never tried South-American Drosera with South-africans , so I will try it next time. D.madagascariensis x

D.montana var. tomentosa must be ..... :yes:

Do you have pictures of any hybrids made by yourself except that beautiful D.esterhuyseniae x D. slackii?

Dani,thanks for sharing them!!

Regards,

Iggy

Wow...nice job...I really love drosera hybrids...

I've some seedlings of D.aliciae x capensis "alba"...they are growing very well and it seems that the crossing is ok...

P.S : Those pictures of D.schwackei are really beautiful!

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Hello Daniel,

Andreas, i received my motherplant from Matthias about 14 months ago,

Then it's from Kamil ;)

All plants in cultivation (which are not many yet) originate from Diamantina, where D. schwackei is endemic to.

Andreas

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Many thanks to all of you. :wink:

Iggy, OK, i will try it with D. ascendens, the result sould be a very nice plant too, if i´ll be successful. :wink:

Today there is no open flower, but tomorrow.

Till now i´ve never tried to cross pollinate plants to get hybrids, but for sure there are enough interesting combinations.

Andreas, thanks, good to know.

Good luck with your plants. :yes:

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hi Dani,

I loved your pictures, are great!

This species is 'the one' in the 'crhysolepis complex', what is the age this plant?

Regards.

Carlos.

Edited by Carlos Rohrbacher

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Thanks Carlos :yes: ,

yes, i like it most of them too, it also has the biggest flower. :wink:

I received it 14 months ago as a small plantlett, so all in all it should be at least 2 years old.

It´s about 3-3,5 cm in diameter and has a 1 cm "stem".

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Congrats for the beautiful pics, wonderful plants, and for getting it to flower so quickly! You must tell your secret to everybody else who always complains to me that they are slower growers, hehehe!

As far as I know you're the first to get it to flower in cultivation after Thomas Carow, who brought live plants back in the late 80's. Andreas, did you say yours are about to flower too?

If you guys were to attempt hybrids, I'd say the closest relatiives you should try them with are D.graminifolia/spiralis, D.chrysolepis, and D.camporupestris.

I love D.schwackei, it's a truly amazing little plant, huh? :)

Thanks for the great pics!

Fernando Rivadavia

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Many thanks Fernando :yes: ,

i can´t believe it that it has not flowered in any other collection till now and i´m wondering a little bit why it´s so rare in collections, it´s one of my favorites too.

Under my conditions this species seems to grow relatively fast (much faster than D. camporupestris, D. chrysolepis, D. graminifolia/spiralis and others) and till now i´ve had absolutely no problems with it. Propagating through leaf cuttings works too, not very good but it works and when they are smaller they have nothing against a little snack.

They are not growing in a terrarium and i water them year round by the tray method, they are standing permanentely in 1-2 cm water.

It has no problems with higher temperatures during summer but it seems to like the cooler nights in the moment too. :wink:

The nights are very cold, outside it´s even snowing right now.

Have Thomas plants flowered too, or has it already disappeared from his collection?

On www.ladin.usp.br i saw your older pictures of D. schwackei, there you have shown pictures from 2 different locations, ´Diamantina´ and ´Congonhas do Norte´ (is it near to the Serra do Cipo or even a part of it?), but on the pictures the plants are slightely different.

The form from ´Congonhas do Norte´ seems to be much more compact, it seems to have much more active leafes and the leafes seem to be shorter.

Are they really different?

About hybridisation, i would have tried a cross with D. camporupstris, D. chrysolepis or D. graminifolia/spiralis, but they are not in flower right now, so if i´ll try it i have to try it with D. ascendens or D. tomentosa (if i´ll try it) which are also flowering in the moment.

Do you give these crossings a chance after they are not the closest relatives?

After talking about hybrids, on www.ladin.usp.br i have seen your older pictures from the very nice D. spec. Cipo (what a pity that here it´s not in cultivation till now, or perhaps yes, who knows?), somehow it looks a little bit like something between D. schwackei and D. camporupestris, D. chrysolepis or even D. ascendens, but...... (only a joke :wink: :wink: )

I´ve not forgotten that you mentioned some time ago that the Serra do Cipo is a very big area and that you are sure that D. spec. Cipo is a true species. :wink:

Carlos, good luck with your plants and hopefully they will flower soon too. :yes:

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hello Dani,

You are right, the form from Congonhas do Norte seems to be slightly different. But I only saw it once, the 1st D.schwackei I had ever seen, and I've never been back to investigate this further. This region is truly a northwards extension of the Serra do Cipó, so it may be present at the latter too -- especially if we are to believe certain herbarium specimens caliming that it was collected in the vicinity of Ouro Preto a few hundred km to the south. See the map in my article on this species (link below):

http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Speci...37n2p36_43.html

D.sp.Cipó is a strange little plant, like a miny D.chrysolepis. I first thought it was a hybrid, until I found populations where it grows on its own. Hard to study though, because it's so rare!

Good luck with your crosses!

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Fernando,

thanks for the link, but i´ve know it already. But i was not remembering that there was a map with the locations too.

Interesting that it´s perhaps also occuring about a few hundred kilometers to the south.

Is it in the ´Congonhas do Norte´ area also growing in such a surreal area with pure white quartz gravel among sparse grasses or is the soil different?

About the D. spec. Cipó, if it´s so rare we have to ask for example Vitor, Carlos or Paulo to search for it. :wink:

About trying a crossing, the first attempt has passed because today no other species has had open flowers, what a pity.

But i will try it with the last one.

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hello Dani,

All the D.schwackei populations I've ever seen grew in the same surreal type of habitat! :)

D.sp."Cipó" grows in the same exact habitat. I've already been all over the Serra do Cipó looking for more of this species, but have only been able to uncover 4 small populations...

As for crosses, I think you can collect the anthers and keep them in the fridge until you have something to cross it with. Don't know for how long the pollen would be viable, but it's worth a try...

Good luck,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Fernando,

thanks for the hint to cut the anthers and keep them in the fridge. :yes: It would be only necessary for one day, so i´ll try it if there is no open flower from D. ascendens at the same time.

I think the last flower of D. schwackei will open tomorrow.

3 days ago i noticed a very small leaf directely next to the inflorescence, today it´s a little bit bigger.

Sorry for the quality of the picture, but the leaf is really very small, it´s diretely in the middle of the picture

P1060621a.jpg

Do you think it´s splitting or is it only some kind of mutation?

And here the sepals are looking right down, the inflorescence is hairy but the pedicels seem to be glandular with only a few shorter hairs, different in comparison to D. camporupestris and D. chrysolepis where the pedicels are also shorter.

P1060594a.jpg

If D. schwackei and D. spec. "Cipó" are only growing in such surreal areas (are this only little "islands"?) it´s perhaps possible to locate such quarz fields (if they are not very big) from higher altitude via some kind of air vehicle which is possible to land and start again almost everywhere. :smile:

Thanks for your time. :tu:

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hello Dani,

It sure is a strange little leaf there. I think I've seen this before in this species, not sure. If you're lucky, in the near future you'll have a nice column of dead leaves with 2 beautiful golden crowns at the top! ;)

Great shot of the inflorescence apex!! Yes your pedicels really do look more glandular than hairy... I can't remember if this is generally true, although I do mention in my description that the pedicels and some other parts are especially glandular.

As for the 'surreal" habitats, I think it would definitely be possible to identify them if you had high resolution pics with some sort of color filtering to be able to identify only the whitest quartz areas. But then you'd need some sort of high resolution altimeter to identify the base of these quartz mounds, where the plants would be concentrated. Furthermore, you'd need one of those cool Mars rovers and something to take it to each of the spots, hahaha! yeah, I guess better to do it on foot! ;)

Good luck with your hybridizations! :)

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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