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Paulo Minatel

Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais State, SE Brazil - Part 2 - lots of photos

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Hello to all,

I’ve just noticed that I was supposed to finish my report about my trip to Serra do Cipó made last May. :wink:

So, I must finish it before reporting my last trip, this one made in the end of July with two Brazilian friends and CPers, Vitor and Nílber. :thumright:

Well, finally here it is, the so-expected Part 2! :bad:

For those who didn’t saw the part 1, here it is:

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=27631

In the following day we explored one of the richest regions of the Serra (range). This is a region with many rock outcroppings from where arise many springs, some of them resist even in the dry season, promoting the diversification of species and making possible for them to get big sizes (this will be best seen in the next report).

But... unfortunately I was with the bad camera, so this is the enormous D. tomentosa var. tomentosa that inhabit this bog:

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Well, now I know how a myopic person feels like... :P

The only good pictures I have of the plants of this site are of the plants collected for herbarium that I took to the car and photographed with another camera before compressing it:

Drosera tentaculata

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And a flower of Drosera camporupestris

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Is on this region that occur some of the rare populations of the also rare Drosera sp. “Cipó”. After many time trying to find them…

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I found…. Nothing! :D

Maybe next time... (I can say that the “next time” was very successful!)

But I found in the way a species that I didn’t found in the first time I visited this region, Drosera chrysolepis:

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Also in this day we went to another region not far from the first that I’d never explored.

This time, with a decent camera, borrowed.

A field with many flowered Actinocephalus sp. (Eriocaulaceae)

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And a beautiful Melastomataceae

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The site didn’t seemed very promising, but I found lots of Drosera hirtella var. hirtella

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I continued exploring the region and I saw a very interesting waterfall far away, the perfect place to find Utricularia neottioides. Mveis-173.jpg

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In the way I found this nice Asteraceae:

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Next to the waterfall, on the margin of this river, I found:

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A small Utricularia amethystina

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And, following the river...

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The beautiful Utricularia neottioides, growing fixed on the rocks in the flowing water:

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Notice the vegetative parts of the plant, fixed in the rock by “apressories” (don’t know the right word in english…)

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And, growing over the wet sedimentary rocks, Drosera tomentosa var. glabrata

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And some died U. neottioides

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And here is the end of the second day…

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In the following day we went to a very interesting region in the North of the Serra, a great sandy valley called Campo Redondo (“round field”). This region seemed to be very promising, the soil was composed by very white sand (quartz sand) and there were many wet places.

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Some Vellozia

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This nice Apiaceae was very common and resembles a Dionaea:

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The most common CPs I found there were Drosera tomentosa var. tomentosa

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Utricularia laciniata

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And Utricularia amethystina (no photos)

The road were very precarious, but it was no problem to the 4x4 S3020129.jpg

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We stopped in a very interesting site where Utricularia laciniata was growing all over

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Such as Drosera tomentosa var. glabrata

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Flower

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Growing in the shadow

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And the Drosera chrysolepis starting to appear

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These plants were quite smaller than the ones I saw in the south. The small size might be associated to the low organic material present in the soil and to the high hydric stress that these plants are submitted.

Here, growing with D. tomentosa var. grabrata

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Some D. chrysolepis were flowered

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A very young plant

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A huge population

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Many of them were with flower buds and opened flowers Mveis-279.jpg

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Mveis-268.jpg

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Back to the car, my advisor showed some Utricularia neottioides that he found... unfortunately the site he found them was too distant and to go there I would have to give up of visiting a place I really wanted to visit... :wink: I decided not to go :D (you will see why below)...

But here is the U. neottioides

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And Genlisea violacea, that also occur in the place I didn’t went to...

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We went back to the road and I could make my stop. Last November everything was too dry and I couldn’t find what I was looking for. But I was very lucky this time and could find some flowering plants of the huge and amazing Genlisea sp. “Cipó“. :bad:

The pictures aren’t mine, but of a friend, Lívia, who photographed the plants while I was searching more of it...

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Notice how glandular it is:

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This nice species looks like a huge G. violacea and also occur more to the north, in the region of Itacambira.

Here is the habitat, a peaty bog in the margin of a dry river.

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At least, in the last day, before going back to São Paulo, I decided to explore the margins of this amazing waterfall:

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And found some Utricularia pusilla

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And this was the end of this amazing trip.

Notice the happiness… 8-)

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Enjoy. :P

All the Best,

Edited by Paulo Minatel

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Hi Paulo, great history and pictures. Brazil is amazing and thanks to people like you we can all have a glimpse at it from far away.

It's very helpfull to see the habitat of the plants I am starting to germinate, it makes me have an idea about how to grow them.

Now we will all be waiting for your next report.

Best regards,

Sebastian

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Hi Paulo,

very nice pictures and the report is also very interesting to read. :P

So many pictures, it took me almost half an hour to look at everything. :bad:

Serra do Cipó must be a very interesting place, really nice landscape, especially the small river.

Most i like D. tentaculata, D. chrysolepis, D. camporupestris, the Melastomataceae, U. laciniata and U. neottioides :wink: .

Is it really only growing fixed on the rocks or also at the edges of the river?

The Apiaceae is also very interesting, it´s really very similar to a Dionaea.

Thanks for sharing. :D

Best regards,

Dani

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thank you very much for sharing your wonderful trip with us! :thanks:

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Thanks Paulo :thanks: Another great report with wonderful pictures of a beautiful landscape and very nice plants - and great Utricularia shots :smile:

Put me on the waiting list for your last trip's report :wink:

Martin

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Great report - thanks for sharing :smile: Some lovely cp photos and scenery shots, the Apiaceae is very interesting too :thanks:

Heather

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Dear Paulo,

What a fantastic trip report and amazing photographs! These are the best close-ups of U. neottioides that I have seen so far! Congatulations! And the first photo I have ever seen of the rare Dionaea-like Apiaceae Klotzschia rhizophylla! Well done, and thanks for showing them!

This Genlisea sp. 'Cipo' is still puzzling to me. Regarding its morphology, it reminds me of what could be a hybrid between G. violacea and G. uncinata. However, looking at its molecular data, it identical to G. uncinata. Maybe I don't have the real thing? I have noticed that several G. uncinata in cultivation here in Europe resemble G. sp. 'Cipo', not typical G. uncinata. Thus maybe I've just got the wrong thing.... ;)

All the best,

Andreas

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Hello Paulo,

Really spectacular trips !! :smile::tu:

Stunning pictures!! I like the colony D. chrysolepis and the utrics.

Thanks for sharing them ...

Iggy

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Wow :tu: Beautiful Landscape and Plant Photos! Great variety of plants :smile:

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Hello,

amazing pictures! The U. neottioides in the water looks great! :tu:

Thanks for sharing!

Regards,

Nicole

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Thanks everybody for the nice comments!

These are the best close-ups of U. neottioides that I have seen so far! Congatulations!

Thanks Andreas!

You can see other nice pictures of this species here: http://www.forum.clickgratis.com.br/planta...vor/t-1693.html

And the first photo I have ever seen of the rare Dionaea-like Apiaceae Klotzschia rhizophylla!

Thanks for the ID!

Well, I don't know where it is rare, but I''m sure it isn't in the Serra do Cipó and Diamantina region. :-)

This Genlisea sp. 'Cipo' is still puzzling to me. Regarding its morphology, it reminds me of what could be a hybrid between G. violacea and G. uncinata. However, looking at its molecular data, it identical to G. uncinata. Maybe I don't have the real thing? I have noticed that several G. uncinata in cultivation here in Europe resemble G. sp. 'Cipo', not typical G. uncinata. Thus maybe I've just got the wrong thing.... ;)

Fernando once told me that the cultivated plants of G. uncinata didn't have the "uncinated" (curved) spur. I never saw this species alive (only photos and herbarium specimens), so it's hard to hypothesize...

I'm not sure if it was Fernando who sent seeds of both species to Europe (although only 1% sure), maybe it's not the right plant...

I'm cultivating G. sp. "Cipó" and I hope to get flowers of it next spring (September/October), maybe we can introduce the right plant with no doubt this time.

All the Best,

Edited by Paulo Minatel

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Wonderful photos! Thanks for sharing!

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