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ChrisR

Good Pinguicula substrate

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Hi

I am trying to source a good Pinguicula substrate that I saw being used by other growers. It is an orange/terracota clay 'gravel' for want of a better phrase. Can someone give me a trade name for it and perhaps a source where I can buy it in the UK? :D

Thanks

Chris R.

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Hi Chris,

I can also suggest Seramis, good stuff.

Eric, you should have given the link to your HP here :D

It was the completely inorganic substrate Eric suggests on Pinguicula.org, that greatly (!) enhanced my cultivation success with the mexican pinguicula. Eric gives

2 perlite, 2 vermiculite, 1 pouzzolane (lava rock), 1 aqualite (can be replaced by one more unit of pouzzolane), 1 fine sand, 1 coarse sand, 1 calcareous clay. All well mixed.
as his recipe. Because of the easier availability, I modified it to equal parts of:

Perlite, Vermiculite, lava (e.g. from garden stores specialized on succulents), sand (1mm), Seramis

what is nearly the same substrate as his of course - instead of calcareous clay I use Seramis and add about a quarter of tap water to my RO water, for the lime in it.

Here the direct link to Erics substrate essay:

http://www.pinguicula.org/pages/culture/cu..._pinguicula.htm

and a link to my P. gracilis thread, where different growers discussed their experience on substrates.

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?s...amp;hl=gracilis

Regards

Martin

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Thanks for all the info guys - really useful :biggrin:

I have been growing pings for many years but have been using the usual peat/perlite/sand mixes and they have been fine for the easy stuff but I have had some problems with getting leaf cuttings to take and with the more tricky species keeling over. With all this new info I will try again with renewed vigor!! :D

Cheers

Chris R.

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Another alternative for fired clay granules goes by the trade name of Turface (it's used around baseball diamonds). Also, I've read on bonsai sites that Oil-Dri can work, and you can also use unscented cat litter if you test it first. You take a small amount and mix it with water, and let it sit for at least an hour and check the granules to make sure they hold their shape. Then you freeze it for a couple of days, take it out and thaw it, and check the granules again to make sure they still hold their structure. If so, it should be good to go for soil mix. I hope this helps.

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For my Mexican pings I am using a mix of Perlite, crushed coral, and eggshells. They seem to be doing fine with it. The key is providing good drainage and alkalinity.

Picture162.jpg

Picture163.jpg

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... and you can also use unscented cat litter if you test it first. You take a small amount and mix it with water, and let it sit for at least an hour and check the granules to make sure they hold their shape. Then you freeze it for a couple of days, take it out and thaw it, and check the granules again to make sure they still hold their structure. If so, it should be good to go for soil mix. I hope this helps.

I've tested a few brands or non-scented clay cat litter here in the UK and all of those tested were made of non-fired fullers earth. When added to a compost mix, the moisture causes the clay granules to revert back to wet clay which bonds the compost together. I don't know, but I don't think this would be suitable.

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I use a mix of peat and horticultural sand 1:1

And my Pinguicula are doing very well.

Photo's

Edit: And sometimes some vermiculite. (thanks AAJ)

Edited by MarcelvW

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I use a mix of peat and horticultural sand 1:1

And my Pinguicula are doing very well.

They are indeed doing very well Marcel :smile:

They are beautiful, I am very envious, but I spy some vermiculite in your pictures. :tu:

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but I spy some vermiculite in your pictures. :tu:

Yes that's true, but not all the plants have vermiculite, simply because I didn't have it before.

If I add it, I put it only at the top, and perhaps 5% in the rest of the soil.

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