Jump to content

Wareham Forest


Recommended Posts

Hello Everyone

A couple of days ago Stewart McPherson and I visited a site in Wareham Forest, Dorset, UK; which we have known about for a few years. I hadn't visited for about 3 years but it was good to see that the Forestry Commision hadn't removed all of the 'alien' plants. One very rare native (non-CP) species which I didn't find this time was the Marsh Gentian, with its stunning electric blue flowers.

Anyway, here are the pictures

Drosera intermedia is very abundant here. D. rotundifolia is also found here, as is the hybrid between the two, D. x beleziana

Wareham_Forest_6.jpg

Wareham_Forest_24.jpg

Some plants were growing stalks because of the high water table

Wareham_Forest_22.jpg

And now for the 'aliens'

Sarracenia purpurea s.sp. purpurea has grown here for many years, with possibly 500 or so plants present

Wareham_Forest_10.jpg

Wareham_Forest_13.jpg

Wareham_Forest_16.jpg

Wareham_Forest_23.jpg

Wareham_Forest_8.jpg

And finally, Stew amid the Sarracenia. As you can see they are slowly spreading

Wareham_Forest_18.jpg

If anyone should want to visit the site, please PM me for details.

Cheers

Andy

Edited by An D Smith
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for posting this Andy, nice to see we have some great looking cps on home ground Those purps look great!!

Is there any sort of protection for the area??

Heather

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice, indeed! I hear several places in Europe, including at least one site in Ireland, (possibly Scotland) where S. purp's have been naturalized, along with some other Sarr's and even a Darlingtonia in Switzerland, possibly one in Germany, and who knows how many VFTs have been sprinkled around too!?

Are there any D. anglica in this site?

- Rich

Edited by rsivertsen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andy,I thought the local council had weedkillered all the purps several years ago? O.K many years ago,i think it was around 2000 when i came to see you with Stew.

Did they miss some,or have they come back from seed.

Ada.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andy,

I was hoping you'd post some shots of this, after Stewart told me you two would be going to this site.

As weird as it is to see purps in sunny old England I must admit they look pretty damn fine.

Thanks for posting matey!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If anyone should want to visit the site, please PM me for details.

And don't forget the Roundup!

I will agree that they do look very attractive- much nicer than most shots you see of them in their natural habitat. Just shouldn't be there though.

Edited by Sean Spence
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, ... It's Photographic Expose's from Up-North, Like This, that Keep-Me Going ["Shuttering"] Down-South!

MORE-PLEASE ... I'm 'Still'-Not Satisfied! >(*U^)<

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Guest David Bird

These plants were very invasive covering a large area and were sprayed in 2004/5 with Roundup that removed most of the adult plants, some clumps were nearly 1m in diameter when I saw the dead clumps that had been dug up and left in piles. This was carried out by the Forestry Commision. Since 2005 the seed heads have been removed each year before they ripen and many of the outlying plants have been pulled up to reduce the area that the plants are found in. The overall quantity has also been reduced by picking out many of the smaller plants. As can be seen in some of the photographs there are many young plants still germinating each year from seed that must have been produced in 2004.

A decision was made to leave some plants in the SSSI as a lot of botanists regard these introductions as a bit of a novelty and it would at least be known where they were in case the introducer decided that Dorset still needed a colony of Pitcher plants. This should not be seen, however, as a green light for any more introductions which would be illegal. Permission was only granted with the agreement that the population would be reduced and managed without the need for herbicides so that it did not spread to other parts of the bog.

David

Link to comment
Share on other sites

GardenOfEden, doesn't Glycophosphate kill virtualy everthing inluding grass? Is it healthy for the animals that may consume poisoned plants?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest David Bird

Yes Roundup does kill everything and did produce bare areas when the plants were originally sprayed, that is why the suggestion was made to control by hand management and not continual annual spraying to control the seedlings that may come up for up to 10 years after the last production of viable seed heads. Not certain that there are many animals in the bog that may be affected by Glyphosate, it is allowed to be used in SSSI and Nature reserves but one has to be careful which make and product is used as the wetting agent additives which differ are more toxic than the pure Glyphosate. The one positive point with Sarracenia is that they have an extremely small root system for a very large surface leaf area where the chemical is absorbed so if one is extremely careful one could spray the centre of the plant and avoid the surrounding vegetation, there is also a 100% kill. This is unlike other plants such as Euroean Gorse with a huge root sytem and a small amount of leaf surface area and one never gets enough herbicide absorbed to go through the whole root system to kill it, there is nearly always regrowth from the roots a year or two later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A decision was made to leave some plants in the SSSI as a lot of botanists regard these introductions as a bit of a novelty and it would at least be known where they were in case the introducer decided that Dorset still needed a colony of Pitcher plants

Double standards? Kill them because they're invasive AND keep them for novelty value?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest David Bird

I do not see that the two facts are connected, they are invasive if left to freely seed, but seeing as the seed heads are removed every year and the numbers of seedlings coming up from old seed are being drastically reduced annually, by a method that will not damage the native vegetation, this character of the particular strain or subspecies present will be nullified. They like many introductions do have a novelty value for many botanists who are always on the look out for new plants and seing how well they survive in British conditions. I am not in any way condoning the people that release non native plants or animals but realise that whatever one says there are always certain individuals that will continue to release them taking no notice of the law or the environmental damage that may result from their misguided act.

Double standards? Kill them because they're invasive AND keep them for novelty value?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A decision was made to leave some plants in the SSSI as a lot of botanists regard these introductions as a bit of a novelty and it would at least be known where they were in case the introducer decided that Dorset still needed a colony of Pitcher plants. This should not be seen, however, as a green light for any more introductions which would be illegal. Permission was only granted with the agreement that the population would be reduced and managed without the need for herbicides so that it did not spread to other parts of the bog.

David

....ahhh! at last, a common sense compromise! :pleasantry:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 13 years later...
2 hours ago, Lizzie constantine said:

Hello I live locally and am interested In the location of the pitcher plants would you mind sharing please? X

 

Thank you

lizzie 

Please, don’t reply to so old posts... you can write a pm to those cpforum members to ask informations;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...