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Daniel O.

D. chrysolepis flower show

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Hello,

a few weeks ago my D. chrysolepis ´Serra do Cipo, Minas Gerais, Brazil´ has flowered and of course i took a few pictures.

The plant is very big, it´s without the flower stalk about 22cm high.

I really like these hairy flower stalks :lol: , similar to these from D. camporupestris, another of my favorites. :Laie_98:

D. chrysolepis

P1030536chrysolepis.jpg

P1030853chrysolepis6.jpg

P1030882chrysolepis3.jpg

P1030878chrysolepis2.jpg

P1030890chrysolepis9-1.jpg

P1030884chrysolepis7.jpg

P1030882chrysolepis4.jpg

a few minutes after i took the first pictures i noticed an insect on the flower, after it was gone the flower looked this way :biggrin:

P1030907chrysolepis8.jpg

for comparison D. camporupestris

P1030301camporupestris.jpg

P1030140camporupestris1.jpg

P1030432campo.jpg

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Very nice flowers, Dani - and well caught! Easy to see by your pics that this one is a real beauty :biggrin:

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Nice flowers!

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Hi Daniel,

great shots, I loved these hairy plants (too).

22 cm is very high for droseras, how do you support them?

Regards.

Carlos.

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Absolutely gorgeous! Why don't we see this species in America?

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Superb Dani !!! :Laie_97:

Very nice flowers and pictures !!

Iggy

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Well grown plants and good pictures Daniel, thanks for sharing.

Regards,

Sebastian

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Thanks for the very kind words. :yes:

Carlos, i have to support it with 2 little woody sticks, otherwise it would fall to the side, especially with this flower stalk. :confused: In the first picture one of these sticks is slightly visible.

In nature the plants for sure don´t have this "problem" because of the vegetation around them.

Jim, i don´t know why these very beautiful species are not so common in your country. Perhaps we have to change it.

In my opinion they are relatively easy growers, i don´t have any problems with them. :yes:

Best regards,

Dani

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Carlos, i have to support it with 2 little woody sticks, otherwise it would fall to the side, especially with this flower stalk. :cool: In the first picture one of these sticks is slightly visible.

In nature the plants for sure don´t have this "problem" because of the vegetation around them.

In nature I saw a lot of Eleocharis sp. and grass around D. camporupestris, but D. chrysolepis is a mistery for me :cool:

Thanks!

Edited by Carlos Rohrbacher

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Hi Carlos,

does that mean that you have not seen D. chrysolepis in nature yet?

Where have you seen D. camporupestris in nature, in the region of ´Serra do Cipo´?

Both plants originate from ´Serra do Cipo´. But for sure this region is very big, too big to see everything.

Are they growing there totally isolated or is it not so common like D. camporupestris in nature?

Best regards,

Dani

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does that mean that you have not seen D. chrysolepis in nature yet?

:shock:

Where have you seen D. camporupestris in nature, in the region of ´Serra do Cipo´?

Drosera camporupestris, Drosera tomentosa var. tomentosa, Drosera montana var. montana, Utricularia pusilla and Genlisea pygmaea, in few time. :yes:

See here

Both plants originate from ´Serra do Cipo´. But for sure this region is very big, too big to see everything.

Are they growing there totally isolated or is it not so common like D. camporupestris in nature?

I looked for in the incorrect places, didn´t has GPS :yes: but I think be more difficult find D. chrysolepis in this (giant) place... Serra do Cipó National Park is Incredible!!!

Kind regards.

Carlos.

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Hello Dani,

Great pics! I'd love to see a shot from further away, showing the whole plants.

D.chrysolepis is a bit more difficult to find than D.chrysolepis at the Serra do Cipó. Or maybe it's just that I tend to hike more around areas where the latter is more common? Or maybe it's because the latter just forms larger/ denser populations and is easier to see (D.chrysolepis is often hidden among thick grasses).

Take Care,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Carlos and Fernando,

Carlos, nice pictures in your link, the landscape is very beautiful, the plants of course too :yes: . It must be like in paradise.

Perhaps you´ll find them next time.

I´ve collected and i´m still collecting a lot of seed, so it´s no problem........ :nono:

This species is producing really a lot of seed.

Fernando, the flower stalk has reached the top of my decks between the lights, so it´s very difficult to take the plant from there to take a picture in the moment without loosing a lot of seed into other pots. :suicide_fool-edit:

The plant itself is about 23cm and the stem is about 14cm, the flowerstalk is about 23cm long. The woody stick is looking about 12cm out of the substrate.

But i have a picture from about 2 months ago. Two days after i have taken the picture i saw the rising flower stalk (there are also some young D. camporupestris in the pot, little invaders :D ).

P1030547chrysolepis1.jpg

emerging flower stalk

P1030559chrysolepis11.jpg

a few days later

P1030591chrysolepis10.jpg

Or maybe it's because the latter just forms larger/denser populations and is easier to see (D.chrysolepis is often hidden among thick grasses).
On habitat pictures D. camporupestris really seems to grow more often in collonies. The thick grasses seem to be very useful for D. chrysolepis, otherwise for sure they would fall to the side.

Are the known locations from both species in the ´Serra do Cipo´ totally separated or are they growing in some places next to each other?

Best regards,

Dani

Edited by Daniel O.

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Hello Dani,

I've never seen the 2 species growing sympatrically, but I once found a D.chrysolepis maybe 15-25m away from a D.camporupestris colony at the Serra do Cipó. It would be very interesting if somebody tried to make a hybrid between them in cultivation! ;)

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hi Fernando,

15-25m is not a very big distance, perhaps it could be enough to cross pollinate themselfes, but for sure the chance is very very small.

OK, next time when they are flowering i will try to make a hybrid :tu: , perhaps i´ll have luck.

Best regards,

Dani

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