Nepenthes Pervillei...?


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Hi all,

I was curious to see if anyone is growing this species. I intend to get one in a couple months, but it seems to have a reputation of being very difficult to grow. Has anyone had experience with this species? I found this on a german website, roughly translated:

"Culture: The plant counts as very difficult in the culture. Moreover the plant are awake quite slowly - first about 10 years after the sowing forms the plant its typical, amphorenförmigen pots at one of the self-forming long drive. There the homeland directly at the equator needs lies the plant light, light and once again light. Full sun is duty. Brown spots on the leaves mean not too much sun in this plant therefore, but rather unfit substrate (to high peat share). The substrate should be very loose and sandy. The temperature is during the day hot - over 20°C are may cool off duty, at night it something, the temperature should lie however between 15-20°C."

I just used one of those free online translators :wink: .

I heard this plant can growin pure granite chips with a thin layer of peat on the surface. Is this true?

Any advice about N. Pervillei is appreciated.

Thanks in advance

- Jeff

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Hi,

I did grow n. pervillei 2 years ago.... it died quickly. Not an easy species, as you can read here and here.

But you will find some sucessful pervillei grower on the CPUK (I'm thinking to at least 2 of them) who will provide you the right advices (the problem is to supply these specific conditions... I can't grow a pervillei in my "standard" lowland terrarium, that's why I gave up)

GOOD LUCK ! :shock:

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Guest Andreas Eils

Hi Jeff,

I´ve lost my bigger specimen of N. pervillei last autumn due to overwatering! It was already 20+ cm in diametre! chillando.gif

My substrate contained a high percentage of perlite and lava rock. The rest was dead sphagnum moss. The problem was water dripping from leaves of higher plants onto the soil of my Pervillei after misting which kept the soil too wet for too long! The result was a total root rotting! So, you have to be very careful about the moisture level of your substrate when growing N. pervillei.

I currently grow another plant which is 12cm in diametre. It´s standing among my Petiolariscomplex Droserae - which means very close to the lights. It´s doing fine but is slow growing. I have a drainage layer of about the lower third of the pot of pure lava rock pieces. N. pervillei dislikes water drops on its leaves during night!

Where is the translated information from? Siggi Hartmeyer´s website? Siggi Hartmeyer is growing adult specimens of N. pervillei in his greenhouse successfully for several years. I think I would avoid peat and use lfs instead - or perhaps adding a little peat to the lfs and some horticultural perlite. And a good portion of lava or granite rocks is well appreciated. I have no experience with granite rocks, lava does it for me! I wouldn´t choose the substrate layer too thin though! Not less then half of the height of the pot if you use pots of 6 to 10cm in height. The substrate should dry well before watering next time. It doesn´t have to become bone dry however. As described in the quoted text: N. pervillei enjoys very warm days (25 - 30°C) but also a good night cooling down to about 20 / 21°C. The plant is much more picky when mature!!! It´s a challenge for sure! :shock:

Good luck from me, too!

Andreas

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Thanks Un Lolo!

- Andreas, That's terrible your large plant died! I do not remember the site I took that translated info from, but it seems pretty useful. Thanks for such excellent tips about media, watering, and temperature. So these plants require night cooling?

I am growing a large Bicalcarata plant and a N. Globosa in the same tank. Will they like the nighttime temp drop as well?

Thanks again!

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Guest Andreas Eils

My Bicalcarata is growing in the same tank as my Pervillei. And all my lowland Neps have to take night temperatures of only 21°C!!!!! :shock: The only thing is they are thriving and pitchering much slower than they would without temperature drops. And regarding my situation it is good my lowland Neps don´t grow too fast! :wink:

Ermm...I´m not sure if Pervillei requires a night cooling, but I´m sure it benefits from a drop in night temperature. Thomas Carow visited the habitat and told me the plants experience mild night temperatures in the low 20th Centigrade and some - partly strong - winds. However I wouldn´t recommend night temps of 30°C for N. pervillei which Bicalcarata for sure loves. :tu:

Cheers,

Andreas

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Hi all,

i am growing 2 different clones of N.pervillei about 4 years and i have no problem with them at all. Give them enough light, high pot with good drainage ( 10cm ) and small layer of peat/sand ( 1:1 ) ~5-8cm.They sit in 1cm of water 12h under 80W CF light.

BTW: maybe it depends on clone ( TC clone could be tricky to grow ). I have plants from seeds.Temperature range: 20-35C with no night drop.

Edited by Milos Sula
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Hi all :happy: ,

Here is my pervillei :happy: :

img2440au9.jpg

img2433ow5.jpg

It 's growing in my lowland growchamber , with much light and a good ventilation .

The temperature range is 22-30c at the moment but pervillei prefer the warm temperatures (25-35c) to make big pitchers and it enjoys the drop in the humidity.

I think that the more importance is the ventilation for this specie...

For the substratum , I use 40% pouzzolane , 30% coco chips , 20% pine bark and

10% peat

Sorry for my bad english :oops: !

Mathieu

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My N. pervillei seeds germinated 1992 and during about the first 10 years they grew nicely in a peat/sand/perlite mix, standing in a tray with water. They receive a lot of light (south-west) and in winter (night temps down to 12-14 degrees centigrade) I provide also light from 2x 400W metalvapour lamps. As soon as the plant starts to develop long-shoots, they should be potted into hanging pots (peat/sand/Seramis mix), because now they don't like the tray watering anymore. Doing so since about 2002 my largest plant developed diverse rosettes at the long-shoots carying the typical amphora-like pitchers. The photo was taken about two years ago. By the way during summer the temperatures at our tropical greenhouse are up to 35-40 degrees and the plant grows clearly faster now than during the wintertime.

nepenthes_pervillei_RG1.jpg

Edited by Siggi_Hartmeyer
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The basal rosette of my largest plant is about 30 cm in diameter. It developed a 1.60 m long shoot which carries four single rosettes (each diameter 18-20 cm) which all carry the typical pitchers (6-8 cm), no more long vined lower pitchers. Interesting for me are the different colours of pitchers at the same plant. Sometimes bright yellow, but somtimes also containing dark red to orange parts. I guess that the amount of direct sun is one factor, but also the background (light or dark) seems to have an influence on the colour when I look at our video pictures made at Morne Seychelloise at Mahe.

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Guest Andreas Eils

Hello,

seems I haven´t promised too much! :biggrin: Siggi, your plant could make me envious! I guess my bigger plant already reached the size when it is sensitive against too wet soil! :wub: Too bad, I always learn the hard way!

Milos, you may be right. My plants came from Wistuba and are for sure TC plants. I have the strange suspicion there are some more species which are particularly picky when from TC. :banging:

Mathieu, you have a funny carnivore in your avatar! lol

Best regards,

Andreas

Edited by Andreas Eils
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Hi Siggy,

please could you tell me what ratio (peat/sand/Seramis mix) do you use for N.pervillei ? Could i replace Seramis with perlite ?

Milos

The basal rosette of my largest plant is about 30 cm in diameter. It developed a 1.60 m long shoot which carries four single rosettes (each diameter 18-20 cm) which all carry the typical pitchers (6-8 cm), no more long vined lower pitchers. Interesting for me are the different colours of pitchers at the same plant. Sometimes bright yellow, but somtimes also containing dark red to orange parts. I guess that the amount of direct sun is one factor, but also the background (light or dark) seems to have an influence on the colour when I look at our video pictures made at Morne Seychelloise at Mahe.
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Hi Milos,

during the last years I replaced Perlite with Seramis and it seems to work. Fist I fill about 3-5 cm pure Seramis to the bottom of the pot, then I add a normal peat/sand mix for Drosera and add about 1/4 Seramis and mix the soil above the pure Seramis layer. I do this just with a kind of "sure instinct" without any formula or weighing the components, as I know that Nepenthes are mostly - and certainly in the case of N. pervillei - very tolerant to variations of that mix. Important is to achieve a loose soil, less compact than the peat/sand mix.

Edited by Siggi_Hartmeyer
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  • 5 years later...

I know this is old, but I ordered one and am thinking of using a mix of 2peat/1 sand /1 basalt, although I also have access to perlite, NZ spag moss, coco peat, husk, clay and many other soil ingredients.

The plant will be 8-10cm diameter and from what I have read I'm thinking a 25-30cm tall pot and a shallow 3-5cm water tray, although as they seem to enjoy drier soil (according to other sources) and my greenhouse is misted twice a day I'm thinking I may not need a water tray at all.

I live in a tropical climate with the most southerly occouring N.Mirabilis population being about an hour or two away, so temp and humidity should suit Pervillei well, also my greenhouse has 3 sections of light, the bright is full sun for most of the day through 50% shadecloth, the second is the same but 70% and the final is 2-3hours moring sun through 50% the rest shaded by tree's (only a few utrics and ampullaria seem to like this), I am thinking the brightest section would suit N.Pervillei best.

My main concern is the soil and watering.

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Mat Jak

"The temperature range is 22-30c at the moment but pervillei prefer the warm temperatures (25-35c) to make big pitchers and it enjoys the drop in the humidity."

Does this mean it like a fluctuation in humidity or is this seasonal or does it in general preffer a lower humidity than most neps?

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N pervillei has a fearsome reputation... I hesitated to try it, assuming it would wither and die within minutes.

I potted mine up into 90% perlite / 10% peat, 6 inch pot, then stuffed it in with all my other lowlanders. So- winters are 18-20c constantly for about 6 months, then summers, night min 20C, days anything from 20 to 45C. In summer, it stands in shallow water, maybe 1cm max.

It's been growing steadily for 2 years now... clearly lack of light isn't an issue.

So, as others have said on this thread, the secret might as simple as having well-drained soil.... although admittedly, mine hasn't started vining yet.

pervillid_zps8a5584b4.jpg

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Hi Gareth,

it does in fact look very good! When I tried using such a large part of perlite (90%) I had problems for sure related to very high microconductivity (or toxicity?) and maybe lack of nutrients.

I couldn't even feed the soil, as it seemed like the salts from the fertilizer would stick to the porous perlite, whose granules were covered by roots (roots love perlite, as you know, because it's wet and yet airy, not to mention the fact that in this kind of mix, it's the only thing they can stick to!). I washed the perlite from above many times, but it didn't seem to work, it was like it was always releasing something (maybe the in-famous fluoride?). Once the peat part was brought up to about 40%, everything went back to normal (I guess, nutrients a part, that the roots were then sticking to the soil, with much less damage from the perlite, and maybe there was a pH improvement too). How do you cope with these issues?... When I use sand, I don't have all these problems...

About your plant, could it also depend on the plant itself? Where is it from? We usually see plants with very small lower pitchers, so even if your plant is not vining, having such big lowers makes me think you'll get a perfectly healthy adult plant.

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Ok, so i'll throw some more basalt in the mix and a little less peat.

Your temps in summer are abit cooler than mine (winter average days 15-23C, summer days of 30-40C, but winter nights get to 4-6C for a few nights now and then and alot of 8C, summer nights are rarely below 20C), but as it is a lowlander I pesume this is ok.

Thanks for the added info on soil aeration, I guess it likes similiar conditions to my N.veilardii, open rocky soil, free flowing and lower humidity is fine.

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