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By 'eck! Thats Unusual....but Why?

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Here are a couple of unusual pictures of orchids, but why are they unusual?

Beautiful Vanda coerulea species.......why is this one unusual?

V.coerulea_Ch.King..jpg

Aeranthes virginalis.... a relatively newly named species from the Comoro's. Exquisite glass like transluscent petals.

Why virginalis?

virgIMG0001_1.jpg

the clue is in this picture

virgIMG0001_2.jpg

Phrag hybrid "Inca Fire"......similar to many but why is this photo unusual?

phragIMG_2921.jpg

phragIMG_2923.jpg

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OK, a few guesses-

1- because it grows cool?

2- after the virgin Mary?

3- a bifurcated scape?

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Guest Andreas Eils

Hello Dicon,

I can´t absolutely detect anything unusual on the Vanda flowers! :thumbsup:

As for the Aeranthes virginalis flower: I ever thought the epithet "virginalis" is normally given for white flowering species (which doesn´t necessarily mean they have to be only white/without blotches etc.). Interesting with the flower you show is the elongated tips of the outer part of the lip cross. Compared to flowers of other Aeranthes species this is unusual. But I don´t know if it is a general feature of the A. virginalis because your pictures are the only ones of this species I can find. :sad: Well, you may find the crossing of the tips in front of the nectar spur symbolic. :man_in_love:

I don´t know if a bifurcated flower stalk is unusual for a Phragmipedium. I find the shadows of some parts of the flower stalk strange. :sad: Like the ovary in the upper flower - its shadow is very broad as is the upper sepal of the same flower compared to other shadows. However the fuzziness of shadows depends on the distance from the object to the wall and also on the incidence of light. But I´m not sure if you mean this?

So, please clear us up. :)

Regards,

Andreas

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Hi Dicon, Sean, Andreas and everybody,

About Vanda coerulea: coerulea means blue or something in that range. For me this is a beautiful pink or very light purple var. which isn't usual for a Vanda coerulea. It could be something as a Vanda coerulea var. Rosea.

Yeah, me and colours... My wife and I always have discussions about blue, purple, pink,.... . I've heard so often that I'm colour-blind, after some time the docile husband starts thinking it's real. Or am I getting older???

I'm surprised to see this Aëranthes. I think the explanation of Andreas is correct. About 17 years ago I received some collected unidentified Aëranthes seeds from the Comores. They told me this was propably a new species.

I've sown them in-vitro and I received a nice bunch of seedlings. At this moment the most of my 50 plants I own have already flowered and there is a colour-range between white/transparant and yellow-gold. (I've never asked the opinion of my wife :man_in_love: ). I've made pics of several plants but these guys are difficult to photopgraph. Where is this Aëranthes species described?

It's very difficult to see two complete opened flowers on a single stem of a Phragmipedium bessae or a hybrid of this species. Most of the time the old flower drops down at the moment that the next flower opens. The fallen flower looks always brandnew without any sign of decay.

These are my thoughts :?

Regards,

Ronny

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Well done Andreas and Ronny,

The Vanda coerulea (The Blue Vanda) is clearly not blue. This is a pink varient known as "Chumpoo King" and comes from a plant collected back in the 1960's. Very difficult to find these days.

The Aeranthes virginalis is as you eluded named so because of the two sepals crossing in front of the spur like a virgin's legs! :vinsent:

It was named as a new species by David L Roberts I believe in 2005. There is little to be found on the subject.

It flowers for me sequentially on a very thin raceme that can stop and start flowering whenever it sees fit, sometimes months apart, sometimes only days!

The Phrag as you rightly point out Ronny usually flowers sequentially, so to see 3 flowers open at once is a treat.

The lower flower, which also has a following bud, opened just after the 3rd flower (now fallen but indicated by the spent sheaths) and the flowers seen are the 4th and 5th.

I am looking at the plant as I write and it still holds all 3 flowers!

Thanks for replying :tu:

Regards

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