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John Jearrard

Sarracenia Purpurea

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With many of the other species starting to look a bit tired, I thought some pictures of S.purpurea looking good would be nice. They have had a really good summer!

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I grow them all in a plastic house, because it keeps them from damage outside. I also get problems with Jackdaws stealing the labels, blackbirds stealing the moss and pecking through the pitchers to get at the flies.

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I quite enjoy the mix of red old pitchers and green new pitchers that S.p.purpurea often shows. This is an almost completely ordinary form, making a sturdy little plant.

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S.p.purpurea.

Hughes Bight, Newfoundland.

This one is quite interesting because of the unusually closed lid. It opens as the pitchers age.

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S.p.purpurea heterophylla.

It is just a really splendid little plant.

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S.p.purpurea.

Upper Peninsula, Michigan.

This form, with very slight veining in the pitchers, has been distributed as "semi-veinless", growing in bogs where heterophylla occurs,, and as ever, people have suggested that it is a hybrid (which seems to be genetic nonsense). My plant was very pale, but has coloured up a lot through the year.

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A curious seedling, derived from the naturalised population at Roscommon, Eire. Almost veinless pitchers. The natural variation in colour of S.p.purpurea is quite wonderful.

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This is the one that doesn't count - once called S.p.purpurea riplicola, but it is only an environmental variant. Taken away from its native alkaline habitat, it is indistinguishable from S.p.purpurea.

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S.p.montana. This one is usually assumed to have a closed mouth, but photos from habitat show that it is quite variable.

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S.purpurea venosa. A tissue cultured clone with a rather atypical lid, but which is growing into a spectacular clump.

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S.purpurea venosa burkii. The Florida population of S.p.venosa, with paler pinkish flowers. A great many of the plants in cultivation claiming to be S.p.venosa are actually burkii. Typical venosa is actually quite uncommon.

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S.purpurea venosa. Gulf Coast.

This is an example of a plant, obtained as venosa, but given the location, clearly burkii !

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S.purpurea venosa burkii. Veinless form.

This is a beautiful little plant. I am always astonished that it has enough chlorophyll to survive, but it seems to manage.

Hope you enjoy them!

John.

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Excellent, another grower of purps! I have a small but expanding collection. Yours is far and awau superior to mine however. Well done.

Regards

Alex.

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i like the last one John,is it the walton co form? looks very much like mine.Ex Phil Wilson?

Ada.

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Very nice John - your pictures illustrate nicely the variation in this species. :smile:

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Hi Ada, my veinless came from Bay Co, but as far as I can see it is the same as the Walton Co. form. I have also seen it as 'Melissa Mazur', but I'm not sure if that is a particular selection of the veinless form, or coining a name for the whole group. I had also heard that Phil Wilson had selected a special form from seed - any further information very welcome ?

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John, mine came from Phil as 1 of three different seedlings.mine was one seedling,one of the others he named Melissa Mazur and i dont know what happened to the third. That's all i can tell you,but one or two people have divisions of my plant.

Ada.

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purp4.jpg

S.purpurea venosa. A tissue cultured clone with a rather atypical lid, but which is growing into a spectacular clump.

I have the same clone, but I think that it's a hybrid, maybe ssp. purpurea x ssp. venosa? Is another 'strange' plant from the dutch greenhouses :)

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