Nepenthes - Pitchers And Seedling Update


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Hi,

Some nep photos.

augnorthiana.jpgaugburkei.jpgauglowii.jpg

N. northiana - N. burkei (Mt Halcon) - N. lowii (Gunung Mulu)

augboschiana.jpgaugreinwardtiana.jpg

Seedlings of N. boschiana (Sakumbang) and N. reinwardtiana (east of Samarinda). Not the quickest growing so far. The biggest are 7-8 cm.

augmirabilis1.jpg

Maybe time to separate some of the seedlings (N. mirabilis, south of Samarinda). :smile:

augmirabilis2.jpg

Especially for François, this N. mirabilis seedling has surpassed all the others. The plant is little more than 10 month old and has a leaf diameter of approx. 40 cm.

Regards,

Christer

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Christer,

As i already said before, you're doing an excellent job with your seedlings. The mirabilis is stunning!

Growing Nepenthes from seeds is a great experience and i intend to do it as often as possible (just sown my seeds from Leiden :D !).

Your lowii and your northiana are very nice too. I wish my northiana looks as good as yours but it is painfully slow (but healthy, though). Would you mind to share your cultivation tehniques about this species, please?

Friendly,

François.

Edited by Sockhom
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Hi,

and thanks for the replies.

Andy,

I have been suspicious about the N. burkei for a while, but I feel I should let this plant mature before giving my verdict. Although this plant is from BE's seed-grown batch collected on Mt Halcon, one can not be sure when it comes to wild-collected seed. I can say though, that there has been a lot of change in the last pitchers, as they are starting to move away from the more waisted look. Also, as can be seen, it has the larger lid which is a trait for this species. I would expect more spotting on the pitchers as well before saying that the id is correct.

François,

I am afraid the N. northiana picture lies a bit. The pitcher is real of course, but the plant itself can hardly be called well-grown. More of an ugly "palm-tree". The leaves looks quite awful right now, which I attribute to the new stronger light, but it pitchers well at least. I've had this plant for several years, and I think it has maxed out at 25 cm during this time. The plant is in the same soil as when I first potted it, sand/peat moss/perlite (good drainage) with some sphagnum moss on top. The mother plant has died down once after growing a basal. This has grown up to be the current plant, which now has a basal itself. I could mention that it is grown warm and humid, but that is hardly a surprise :wink:

Eventually I feel it might be best to grow it with some other low-light plants to get the nice green foliage again. This coincides with some peoples advice that is doesn't like strong light. Strange really, as photos from the wild often show plants that are quite exposed to the sun.

Regards,

Christer

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Hello Christer! :cool:

Thanks for this comprehensive response.

Some of you might be interested by the following pictures and comments. Growing Nepenthes from seeds can sometimes be very rewarding:

The first picture, taken on december 4 th 2006, show some very small Nepenthes boschiana seedlings (seeds from Stewart Mc Pherson too) a few weeks after germination. Because of a lack of place, i placed the extra boschiana seedlings around a young Nepenthes aristolochioides i received three months earlier in september (Look closely, you will see the small seedlings).

The boschiana babies have thus roughly been treated the same way as all my regular highland species

dsc3864ux8.jpg

The second picture has been taken on august 12 th of this year:

s6002009at8.jpg

Please, note that these very boschiana seedlings have not experienced optimal conditions. Because of the expanding aristolochioides -who really appreciated the winter period in my garage by the way - they only received filtered light.

Boschiana seedlings which have been placed in better conditions (20 cm distance from the tubes) grew much faster and are now 7 to 15 cm across. You may already know the following picture. This boschiana is in a 13 cm square pot:

s6002038tc4.jpg

Friendly,

François.

Edited by Sockhom
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Not directly relevant, but vaguely interesting maybe is that while re potting some of my boschiana and reinwadtiana seedlings, i broke of the roots of one of them. Thinking it was probably a goner i nearly binned it, but stuck it back in the sphagnum on a whim. It has now grown a new root!!! I was absolutely stunned is survived...

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Not directly relevant, but vaguely interesting maybe is that while re potting some of my boschiana and reinwadtiana seedlings, i broke of the roots of one of them. Thinking it was probably a goner i nearly binned it, but stuck it back in the sphagnum on a whim. It has now grown a new root!!! I was absolutely stunned is survived...

Great! but don't tell me you pulled out the poor little thing to check that very root :cool::cool: ?

Friendly,

François.

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Yes, growing neps from seed is indeed very rewarding. It's a new experience to me, at least to have fresh enough seed that will germinate. Some of my bosh and mirabilis seedlings - which was sown on vermiculite/perlite - took some punishment when still very small, but bounced back when repotted in sphagnum.

François,

that boschiana seedling has some great color, and after seeing Robs photos of a mature plant of this form, I think we have something to look forward to.

manders,

Good to know that there are more N. reinwardtiana out there, I assume of course that you a referring to the variety from Samarinda that Stewart offered seed of last year. It would be a shame to not keep this form growing in cultivation. It will be interesting to see if it is the one called var. samarindaensis, which differs from the typical by having a round stem. I seems likely considering the location name. Just the last few days I have noticed that the three seedlings that I have are really putting on size.

Regards,

Christer

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Yes, growing neps from seed is indeed very rewarding. It's a new experience to me, at least to have fresh enough seed that will germinate. Some of my bosh and mirabilis seedlings - which was sown on vermiculite/perlite - took some punishment when still very small, but bounced back when repotted in sphagnum.

François,

that boschiana seedling has some great color, and after seeing Robs photos of a mature plant of this form, I think we have something to look forward to.

manders,

Good to know that there are more N. reinwardtiana out there, I assume of course that you a referring to the variety from Samarinda that Stewart offered seed of last year. It would be a shame to not keep this form growing in cultivation. It will be interesting to see if it is the one called var. samarindaensis, which differs from the typical by having a round stem. I seems likely considering the location name. Just the last few days I have noticed that the three seedlings that I have are really putting on size.

Regards,

Christer

Christer,

Yes the seedlings are from Stewart, I also have a var samarindaensis from Malaysiana tropicals so it will be interesting if to see if they are similar.

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