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armyranger10a

what type of sundew can handle cold weather best?

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Well it depends how cold it will be. A few can take pretty cold temps given proper mulching. I would recomend any filiformis except the red form and rotundifolia. But im no expert by any means so others please chime in and correct me if nessasary.

Shawn

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Here in the UK, rotundifolia, binata, x hybrida and intermedia all live outdoors year-round in my barrel bog. Winter minimum temps have been relatively mild in recent years, but have still probably reached -7/8 at least.

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And D. anglica, D. tokaiensis, etc.

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I have started a cold test of Droseras and other temperate CPs here in Denmark. The goal is to test as many species, localities and cultivars as possible. Both sheltered in the unheated greenhouse and outside.

I have worked for many years with cold hardy succulents and have identified at least 1000 forms that can live unheated here in Denmark. Now I am starting with the CPs.

Martin

Z7

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D. rotundifolia, intermedia, anglica, filiformis filiformis, filiformis tracyi, linearis, stenopetala and arcturi as well as hybrids of these species are completely hardy in my part of Germany (USDA zone 8 ) and usually experience frost and snow in their natural habitats. D. capillaris from N America and D. binata usually survive in my climate too.

Regards

Jens

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D 'Lake Badgerup' survived winter outside this year with one night of -7. They all survived and are now flowering again. Actualy i was wondering if any other pygmies are frost hardy also?

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It is always difficult to predict exactly how hardy plants are. Another family of plants I work with are the mesembs from RSA. While there exsist alpine forms that are obvious frostresistent to a certain degree, these plants are much more frost hardy than what you would think if you look at climate data from their naturel habitat. We have selected plants that can tolerate -20C and some even down to -30C although you would never find these temps in South Africa. Also lowland plants of many mesembs show hardines to - 10/-15C, temperatures they will never experience in habitat. Maybe these frostgenes have developed in a periode where there was colder?

I am certain that there are also frost hardy CPs from RSA. The same situation could be from SW Australia and obvious Tasmania. Our knowledge about it are not big, perhaps because noone has ever wanted to frost their collection of plants. The commings year will tell when more species are being tested here in Denmark and elsewhere.

Martin

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Where exactly are you? And how do you plan to handle the winter for them?

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Well i live in northern us, massachusetts. Well, still figuring out what to do for winter. I have a s flava , Purple pitcher, Capensis sundew, venus flytrap.

I'm in the Buffalo, NY area and I've been wintering all American pitcher plants, VFT's, and American temperate sundews + D. binata, in buckets as mini-bogs by toting the buckets to the attic and placing by a south window sill (November-April). I keep tabs on them every week and add water sparingly. They are uncovered and left to the ebb and flow of temps and the slow changing photoperiod. By February, one by one, the plants begin waking up and exhibiting new growth. Do you have an attic with a window?

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