windowsill heliamphora - spring pics


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Gorgeous Martin :twisted: !

That sunpitcher is even more beautiful than the last time!

When do you use the lamp shown on the picture? Only in winter times?

By the way, do you grow the small Nepenthes truncata of the last picture on the windowsill as well?

Friendly,

François.

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Thanks :D

François, I remove the lamp in early summer (so the next days ) and use it again in October or so.

The truncata is growing there for nearly a year now. Not too fast (or maybe I should have more patience) but it grows and pitchers, like another nepenthes next to it (ventrinermis or another hybrid. Maybe I should post a pic and you could help me with the ID :) )

Chug, if you can obtain it try out this hybrid. It is quite easy and worth another try.

Here another picture of it

b3yt9.jpg

Regards

Martin

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Chug, if you can obtain it try out this hybrid. It is quite easy and worth another try.

Yeah, I have tried it. I think some thrip got into the current plant I have, so its not longed for this world for long. But the first two got hit hard by the heat and died not long after. About a 2 days after, infact. Yours looks better and better tho. :)

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  • 8 months later...
The bulb is a 23W ESL, in 827 colour, the ordinary type.

I not really familiar with the lamp colour numbering system. As you said it's the ordinary type would this be warm white (2700 Kelvin)?

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Yes thats correct.

There used to be different systems, one for each manufacturer, but this one will be hopefully the common one.

The first number (8) drecribes how close the light comes to sunlight (to be correct - the light index R(a) )

The second and third are for the colour (27=2700K)

Regards

Martin

Edited by Martin Hingst
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In the UK compact fluorescent lamps (CPL) are usually labelled as warm white or daylight, with the former being far more common. All the warm white CPL I've found, so far, are 2700 Kelvin.

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mobile,

here in Germany the situation is similar, mostly warm white (2700K) sometimes cool white (4000K) and rarely sky white (6000 or 6500K) in standard shops. But on the internet you will find other types as well.

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I guess it is because of that irritating different use of those colour names that the three numbered system was established.

As far as I know in Germany the name "daylight" is reserved (or used) for the 9er lights (with a R(a) >=90) here, e.g the 960 or the 965er lights.

Edited by Martin Hingst
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  • 1 year later...

Hi Carl,

yes I still have this setup, one of the few (:banging:) that "survived" my move last month...had to give away many of my plants, but this one has always been quite easy in maintaining and not much time-consuming. And my healthiest Heliamphora - but that doesn't really surprise, as this hybrid is an easy grower.

At the moment I run a new experiment - how long can this plant survive without regularly watering and no artificial light on a north facing window... thanks for your memento - about time to do something!

Regards

Martin

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The H. heterodoxa hybrids seem to be quite resilient. I too have H. heterodoxa x minor and it has survived the various different environments I have put it in, though I'm not too sure that it would be happy 'without regularly watering and no artificial light on a north facing window' :wink:

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